Student Bulletin

Geisinger Commonwealth 2017-2018 Student Bulletin

  1. Academic Advising
  2. Academic Records
  3. Accreditation
  4. Administrative Leadership
  5. Admissions Office
  6. Board of Trustees
  7. Bursar’s Office
  8. Career Services
  9. Center for Learning Excellence
  10. Clinical Skills and Simulation Center
  11. Clubs and Organizations
  12. Counseling
  13. Curriculum Overview
  14. Disability Services
  15. Facilities
  16. Faculty
  17. Financial Aid
  18. Geisinger Commonwealth Diversity Statement
  19. History
  20. Housing
  21. Library
  22. MD Course Descriptions
  23. MD Curriculum Details
  24. MD Grading Definition
  25. MD Student Competencies
  26. Office for Community Engagement and Equity
  27. Office of the President/Dean
  28. Orientation
  29. Other Programs
  30. Policy on Criminal Background Checks
  31. President’s Management Org
  32. Printing and Copying
  33. Procedures Regarding Remediation of Classwork
  34. Regional Campus Organization
  35. Regional Campuses
  36. Research Opportunities and Summer Internships
  37. Safety/Security
  38. Student Health and Welfare
  39. Student Health Insurance
  40. Student Identification
  41. Student Policies
  42. Student Space and Room Reservations
  43. Student Transcripts
  44. Student Wellness
  45. Summer Enrichment Program
  46. Technical Standards
  47. Technology
  48. The Regional Education Academy for Careers in Science
  49. Title IX
  50. Welcome from Academic Affairs
  51. Welcome from Student Affairs

Academic Advising

Advising

In accordance with Geisinger Commonwealth’s mission, advising services are based on a model that is developmental and proactive in nature. This model aims to help learners maximize their potential by providing differential assistance and support to students throughout their education as they build upon their science/research base and develop clinical and professional skills. 

Advising is delivered through the construction of advising teams.  Each team will be led by a full time faculty or professional staff member.  This structured and consistent approach supports students while interfacing with the career curriculum offered through the Professional Identity Formation competency content within the full educational program.  This model affords students a holistic experience through the efforts of small group advising teams and individual meetings to monitor student progress and support their achievement of professional competencies. 

Academic Records

Student academic records are confidential and are maintained in the college registrar’s office. Records will be available to students for review in accordance with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (FERPA). FERPA allows disclosure of student information without consent to school officials with legitimate educational interests, i.e., if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. A student may request that official copies of his/her academic transcripts to be sent to designated individuals or organizations by providing a signed transcript request form and the established fee to the registrar’s office. Unofficial transcripts are available at any time upon request. If a student or former student has any outstanding obligations to Geisinger Commonwealth, financial or otherwise, release of the official records will be withheld until the obligations are satisfied.

The student may request in writing an amendment to the education record that he or she believes is inaccurate or misleading. The request should be directed to the vice dean/vice president for academic affairs. The vice dean/vice president for academic affairs, or a designee, will consult the college official or faculty member responsible for the record. The vice dean/vice president for academic affairs will notify the student of the decision. The student may appeal the decision in writing to the dean. The dean will make the final determination and notify the student of the decision.

 

Accreditation

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine (Geisinger Commonwealth), like most other colleges and universities, participates in accreditation and other programs in which peer organizations evaluate programs and operations to assist the college in continuous improvement. In addition, Geisinger Commonwealth has undergone an application and review process by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to be given “degree-granting authority” by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Degree-granting authority is a distinct privilege and is completely separate from incorporation as an educational institution. Such authority is subject to regulation by individual states. Accreditation is a separate process and ensures that education provided by institutions of higher education meets acceptable levels of quality. Accrediting agencies, which are private educational associations of regional or national scope, develop evaluation criteria and conduct peer evaluations to assess whether those criteria are met.

The first step in these processes for Geisinger Commonwealth was to receive degree-granting authority from the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). This authority was received in April 2008 and allowed the college to accept students for the Masters of Biomedical Sciences (MBS) and Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree programs.

Geisinger Commonwealth received “preliminary” accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) in October 2008. In June of 2012, Geisinger Commonwealth received “provisional” accreditation. In July 2014, Geisinger Commonwealth received full accreditation by the LCME. This certifies that Geisinger Commonwealth’s MD degree meets national standards for structure and function.

In June 2014, The Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) granted Geisinger Commonwealth full accreditation. To earn and maintain full accreditation, colleges and universities must demonstrate to colleagues from peer institutions that they meet or surpass mutually agreed-upon standards. The MSCHE assures students and the public of the educational quality of higher education. The Commission’s accreditation process ensures institutional accountability, self-appraisal, improvement, and innovation through peer review and the rigorous application of standards within the context of institutional mission. This certifies that Geisinger Commonwealths Master degrees meet higher education standards for structure and function.

Geisinger Commonwealth has also been approved by the United States Department of Education for participation in the Title IV Federal Direct Student Loan Program. Access to this simple-interest, government-guaranteed, no-collateral loan program allows students a much more desirable fixed interest rate for school loans and repayment is delayed until six months after leaving school or graduating.

  

Administrative Leadership

President’s Cabinet

Steven J. Scheinman, MD, President and Dean
Ida L. Castro, JD, Vice President for Community Engagement & Chief Diversity Officer
Marise Garofalo, Vice President for Institutional Advancement
William F. Iobst, MD, FACP, Vice President for Academic and Clinical Affairs and Vice Dean for Medical Education
Venard Scott Koerwer, EdD, Vice President for Strategy, Planning & Communication and Vice Dean for Graduate Education
Anna M. Rusnak Noon, CPA, MBA, Vice President for Finance and Administration and Chief Financial Officer
Rebecca S. Slangan, MBA, Executive Office Manager

Leadership Council

Steven J. Scheinman, MD, President and Dean
Tanja Adonizio, MD,  Associate Dean for Student Affairs
John A. Arnott, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and Chair of Faculty Council
David Averill, PhD, Chair of Basic Sciences
Jennifer Boardman, PhD, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs for the School of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology 
Diana Callender, MBBS, DM, Chair of Clinical Sciences 
Ida L. Castro, JD, Vice President for Community Engagement and Chief Diversity Officer
Heather M. Davis, MFA, Director of Marketing & Communications
Andrea DiMattia, MEd, Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs & Faculty Development and Director of Academic and Clinical Affairs
Michael Ferraro, MD, Regional Associate Dean, South Campus
Stephen R. Fisk, Associate Director, Human Resources
Marise Garofalo, Vice President for Institutional Advancement
John Gorczyk, Director of Facilities & Public Safety
William F. Iobst, MD, FACP, Vice President for Academic & Clinical Affairs and Vice Dean for Medical Education
Venard Scott Koerwer, EdD, Vice President for Strategy, Planning & Communication and Vice Dean for Graduate Education
John Kulp, PhD, Regional Assistant Dean, Doylestown Campus
Teresa Lacey, RN, 
Executive Director, Behavioral Health Initiative
Edward Lahart, MS
, Registrar and Chair of Staff Council
Christine Meholic, MPA, Director of Project Planning and Institutional Effectiveness
James Michaels, MBA, Chief Information Officer
Andrea Mulrine, CFRE,
 Senior Director of Advancement Operations / Campaign Manager
Sonia L. Planey, PhD, Interim Associate Dean for Research
Anna M. Rusnak Noon, CPA, MBA, Vice President for Finance & Administration and Chief Financial Officer
Michelle Schmude, EdD, Associate Dean for Admissions, Enrollment Management and Financial Aid & Assistant Professor
Shubhra Shetty, MD, Regional Associate Dean, North Campus
Rebecca S. Slangan, MBA, Executive Office Manager
Erin Sutzko, EdD, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Director of Graduate Admissions
Michelle Thompson, MD, Associate Chief Academic Officer, Graduate Medical Education 
Janet M. Townsend, MD, Senior Associate Dean for Regional Campuses, Community and Educational Affairs 
Thomas VanderMeer, MD, Regional Associate Dean, Guthrie Campus
Carien Williams, JD, Associate Dean for Curriculum
Nicole Woll, PhD, Vice President, Faculty & Curriculum Development
Elizabeth Zygmunt, Director of Media & Public Relations

Admissions Office

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine (Geisinger Commonwealth) Office of Admissions is responsible for recruitment, admission, and enrollment of students who exemplify our mission to serve northeastern Pennsylvania’s healthcare needs and share our core values of academic excellence, experiential diversity, and service for the medical and graduate school programs. Students admitted to Geisinger Commonwealth create a legacy of physicians and healthcare professionals who are dedicated to improving the quality and delivery of healthcare for all. The Office of Admissions works with prospective students year-round.

MD Application Process

The Doctor of Medicine (MD) application cycle begins in June and can continue until the following August. All candidates must complete an application online via the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). Applicants need to submit all requested documentation to AMCAS, along with the necessary application fee. All completed and verified AMCAS applications are downloaded into Geisinger Commonwealth’s application system.

Upon receipt of the verified AMCAS application, candidates are invited to complete the Geisinger Commonwealth secondary application, and submit the  required $100 application fee. Students who have received a waiver via the AMCAS Fee Assistance Program (FAP) will also receive a waiver for the secondary application. The secondary application is designed to evaluate a candidate’s match with Geisinger Commonwealth’s unique mission, values and educational philosophy.

All applicants are required to submit one pre-professional/pre-health/committee letter or three evaluation/recommendation letters from faculty who are familiar with the applicant’s career goals and academic coursework. Geisinger Commonwealth participates in the AMCAS letter service and letters should be submitted through the candidate’s AMCAS application.

Candidates are notified via email when their application status changes. Students may also monitor their application status by logging into the student portal provided by Geisinger Commonwealth.

MD Application Review

Applications that contain a verified AMCAS application, a completed secondary application, MCAT scores and letters of recommendation are considered complete and are sent to be screened and reviewed holistically by the Admissions Committee. The Admissions Committee considers academic ability, extracurricular involvement and candidate’s overall “fit” with Geisinger Commonwealth’s mission and values when evaluating candidates.

MD Interview Day

Applicants who appear to be a match for Geisinger Commonwealth and who, after screening by the Admissions Committee are deemed as meeting the screening criteria, are offered an interview at Geisinger Commonwealth. The interview day is structured to provide applicants with the greatest exposure to Geisinger Commonwealth’s people, facilities and curriculum. Interviews are conducted on the main campus of the college in Scranton, Pennsylvania from September through February or until all selected candidates have completed an interview. Interviews are held on Mondays and Fridays and some select Wednesdays and Saturdays. The interview day begins with a welcome and two 30-minute interviews with a Geisinger Commonwealth faculty member and/or clinician, and a second-year medical student. Following the interview, candidates attend a presentation on the Geisinger Commonwealth curriculum and then have lunch with current medical students. During lunch, applicants have the opportunity to speak with current students to learn what life is really like as a Geisinger Commonwealth medical student. After lunch, candidates tour the Medical Sciences building, attend an admissions, financial aid and student affairs presentation, and complete an anonymous online survey before departure. The entire interview process lasts approximately six hours.

MD Selection Process

Upon completion of the interview, both the faculty and student interviewer complete and electronically submit an interview evaluation form. Upon receipt of the evaluations, the candidate’s file becomes complete and is sent to the Admissions Committee for review.

Each member of the Admissions Committee independently reviews each candidate’s file and submits a score. When all members of the committee have scored the file, it is ready to be discussed by committee members. The Admissions Committee meets regularly each month to discuss application files and to render admissions decisions.

When a student is offered a place in Geisinger Commonwealth’s MD class, they are notified via email and paper mail. Students can expect to receive an admissions decision six to eight weeks after their interview date.

Students placed on the waitlist can be offered admission until the first day of orientation.

 

 

 

 

Board of Trustees

Click here for information on Geisinger Commonwealth’s Board of Trustees.

Meet the Board of Directors

Robert DietzChair
Earl Foura, Vice Chair
David T. Feinberg, MD, MBA
Pedro J. Greer, Jr., MD
V. Chris Holcombe, PE
David H. Ledbetter, PhD, FACMG
Virginia McGregor
Deborah E. Powell, MD
Steven J. Scheinman, MD

Board Officers

PresidentSteven J. Scheinman, MD
Geisinger Health System Executive Vice President, Chief Academic Officer

TreasurerKevin F. Brennan
Geisinger Health System Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

SecretaryAtty. David J. Felicio
Geisinger Health System Executive Vice President, Chief Legal Officer

Assistant SecretaryAtty. Daniel E. Lohr
Geisinger Health System Associate Chief Legal Officer

Bursar’s Office

Hours

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Bursar’s Office is located in the East Wing of the Medical Sciences Building on the 3rd floor. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The office will be closed on college holidays. Individual appointments may be made by calling the office at (570) 504-9075 or by email at Bursar@tcmc.edu. The Bursar’s Office is the sole source of official information concerning tuition/fee rates and policies. All inquiries regarding tuition/fee charges and account payment responsibilities should be addressed to this office.

Main Duties and Responsibilities

Billing and Collection

The Bursar’s Office is responsible for the billing and collection of all student charges, as well as the receipt of any cash for the college. Students will be sent an estimated tuition statement approximately 30 days before the start of classes for each term.

Geisinger Commonwealth reserves the right to cancel the registration of a student with an unmet financial obligation that results for any reason. Furthermore, Geisinger Commonwealth reserves the right to withhold a diploma, transcript, letters of recommendation or other official documents for a student with an outstanding financial obligation to the college.

Student Refunds – Credit Balances

If a credit balance occurs on a student’s account after billed tuition and fees are fully paid, the resulting credit balance will be refunded to the student so the funds may be used for other “cost of attendance” expenses. Refunds of credit balances are made within 14 days after a credit balance occurs. Students will be responsible for the immediate payment of any charges that are added to his or her student account after a refund occurs. Refunds related to withdrawal, dismissal or leaves of absence are addressed under the Geisinger Commonwealth Refund Policy below.

Payment of Student Charges

Payments are due the first day of class. Please note the amount due to the College will be tuition and fees less scholarships and student loans. If you have completed all of the proper steps in order to finalize your Federal Loans they will be disbursed to your account on the first day of class. An exception to this policy can be made if a 3rd party has agreed to pay the full amount of a student’s account.

A student will not be considered officially registered until full payment of tuition and fees has been made by the established due date, unless some other satisfactory payment arrangements, such as a deferment of payment agreement, is approved by the Bursar’s Office. A student’s registration will be cancelled if full payment is not made by the due date, that student’s place in the class will be given to a student on the admissions waiting list. Once a student registration is cancelled, it can only be reinstated by full payment, assuming there is an opening in the class.

Payments may be made by check, money order, cash, wire transfer or electronic check. Geisinger Commonwealth does not accept credit cards for tuition payments. Checks should be made payable to Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. Payments by paper check should be addressed to:

Geisinger Commonwealth
Attn: Bursar’s Office
Medical Sciences Building
525 Pine Street
Scranton, PA 18509

There will be a non-refundable fee of $35 for any checks or electronic payments returned by the bank for insufficient funds or for any other reason. The college does not accept second-party checks or credit cards for tuition and fees payments.

Geisinger Commonwealth Refund Policy

This cancellation policy applies to students who choose to withdraw, to take a leave of absence or who are dismissed for any reason. In order for a student to be eligible for any cancellation or refund, the student must submit his or her notice of withdrawal, in writing or orally, to the associate dean for student affairs. The date of the receipt of this notice determines the official date of withdrawal. Exceptions to this policy will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the CFO.

Refunds will be made according to the following:

Date of Withdrawal

*Cancellation Percent

On or before the first day of classes

100%

Up to the end of the second week of classes

75%

Up to the end of the fourth week of classes

50%

Up to the end of the sixth week of classes

25%

After the end of the sixth week of classes

0%

*Cancellation Percentage refers to the percentage of a semester’s tuition charges that will be cancelled upon withdrawal.

Ordinarily, fees are non‐refundable, except for the technology fee, the student health insurance fee, and the disability insurance fee, under certain conditions. The MD technology fee and MBS technology fee may be refundable according to the terms of the technology lease that each student is required to sign before receiving hardware and/or software. The student health insurance fee may be prorated as described in the Student Health Insurance Policy. The disability insurance fee is refundable for withdrawals that occur before the first day of classes (or before the first day of Orientation for new students). Any changes to this refund policy will be provided to students with their fall and spring student invoices. For purposes of this policy, one week equals five class days. The first day of classes for the fall and spring terms is the date published in the College Student Bulletin.

The death of a student shall cancel charges for tuition as of the date of death and the tuition will be adjusted on a pro rata basis.

The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 require that when a recipient of Title IV grant or loan assistance withdraws from an institution during a payment period or period of enrollment in which the recipient began attendance, the institution must determine the amount of Title IV grant or loan assistance that the student earned as of the student’s withdrawal date. A refund according to the college policy may be due to the student, but for students who are recipients of federal Title IV funds, the money may, based upon date of withdrawal, be returned to the aid program from which the funds were disbursed. Students are encouraged to contact the Geisinger Commonwealth Financial Aid Office for additional information or if they have questions regarding this policy. Refunds will be processed and sent to the student within five business days after notification to Geisinger Commonwealth of withdrawal.

All refund policies, return of Title IV funds policy and the procedures students must follow to officially withdraw from the college can be found on the Geisinger Commonwealth website and portal.

Federal Regulations Concerning Privacy and Confidentiality

Due to very strict federal regulations concerning privacy and confidentiality, the Bursar’s Office will not be able to discuss or release information regarding a student’s account without the student’s written approval. This includes phone calls related to the payment of bills. Students who desire to have the Bursar’s Office discuss their bills with appropriate people (such as parents who wish to make payments, spouses, etc), should complete a FERPA permission form giving the Bursar’s Office this permission. This form is available through the Geisinger Commonwealth portal.

Career Services

The Geisinger Commonwealth’s Career Curriculum is embedded within the Professional Identity Formation competency content and embodies our mission and values. It relies on current career development theories and models to assist students in their Professional Identity formation, utilizes the Careers in Medicine model to support all phases of the career decision making process for students and offers training and development to prepare faculty and career advisors for their roles.

The career advising system ensures that students have the knowledge, support and resources necessary to make informed decisions. The combination of the centrally provided content and individual processing opportunities allows for multiple touch points with students throughout their medical careers.

Medical students can expect the following outcomes from active participation in the career planning process:

  • Development and articulation of professional identity in an interpersonal context.  
  • An understanding of the important steps necessary toward students’ journey of self-authorship and engagement in continual self-assessment and reflection to identify their skills, abilities and interests in the selection of a medical specialty.
  • Development of a self-directed career and resource identification plan.
  • Enhancement of interpersonal communication skills through the development of a competitive curriculum vitae, personal statement and mock interviews.
  • Further development of professional skills necessary to effectively interact with others.
  • Demonstration of professional behavior consistent with valuing difference in all settings.
  • Demonstration skills of reflection through writing and discussion.
  • Integration of content knowledge from other courses.

 

Center for Learning Excellence

Individual academic support, peer group review sessions, tutorials and group workshops are provided to students who wish to enhance their learning experiences. The staff of The Center for Learning Excellence assists students with issues related to time management, stress management, memory techniques, higher-level study skills, organization, and presentation skills and reading efficiency. In addition, workshops are offered to help students prepare for Step 1 of the USMLE (United States Medical Licensing Examination). Tutorial services are available for all students through a peer tutoring program. Upper-class students (M2, M3 and M4) are recruited to assist their peers in coursework where they have demonstrated success. All peer tutors are recommended by faculty and are trained in effective learning and referral techniques. Tutorial services are offered at no cost to students through small group and individual formats. Students may request tutoring on their own or they may be referred to tutoring by faculty or following a review by the Committee on Academic and Professional Standards. Tutorial services are administered through The Center for Learning Excellence.

 

Clinical Skills and Simulation Center

Geisinger Commonwealth’s Clinical Skills and Simulation Center (CSSC) brings simulated patient experiences to life. The use of simulated patient experiences is an educational technique that allows interactive, immersive types of learning. In the CSSC, students interact with one another, other healthcare professionals and students, CSSC staff, faculty, state-of-the-art manikins and equipment, clinicians and patient actors (Standardized Patients) throughout their education to accomplish curriculum objectives, specific skill competencies, and assessment. The CSSC enhances student learning experiences by providing a means for standardized repetitive practice of clinical scenarios in a safe environment that does not put real patients at unnecessary risk.

Standardized Patients

A Standardized Patient (SP) is a person trained to portray a real-life patient in a standardized, scripted clinical scenario.

Geisinger Commonwealth’s SP program consists of committed SPs and patient models who provide students the opportunity to practice their interviewing, counseling, physical exam, communication and other skills that contribute to their development as professionals in the field of medicine. SPs work year-round and have been trained to portray patients in a wide selection of realistic scenarios. In addition, Geisinger Commonwealth SPs are trained to evaluate history taking, physical exam and communication skills, and to provide students with useful patient-centered feedback.

During the 2016-17 academic year SPs participated in more than 5000 hours of educational sessions, including instructional clinical skills sessions in the preclerkship years, assessment of students in the preclerkship years, formative and summative Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs,) hybrid simulations, faculty trainings and presentations, instructional videos and community outreach education.

The High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulator

The Human Patient Simulator is designed and intended to portray real-life patients in a standardized, scripted way. This technology is used to reproduce aspects of patients and patient care in an effort to meet educational goals and objectives. T Simulators provide students the opportunity to practice their interviewing, counseling, physical exam, communication and other skills that contribute to their development as professionals in the field of medicine.

Task Trainers

The CSSC also has a variety of task trainers such as a lumbar puncture trainer, a female pelvic trainer, and a central line trainer for example. Task trainers are models that represent a part or region of the human body designed to train in just the key elements of the procedure or skill.

Facilities:

The CSSC is a 10,039 square foot space located on the first floor (West Wing) of the Medical Science Building. It consists of the following student learning spaces:

  • 12 exam rooms equipped with an examination table and diagnostic equipment (including: blood pressure cuff, thermometer, otoscope, ophthalmoscope and stethoscope.) Exam rooms have working sinks, temperature control, desktop computers, telephones, audio visual (A/V) equipment for recording student examination and activities, and other specialized equipment used for more invasive physical exams.
  • An OB/GYN bay houses a birthing simulator (Noelle) and newborn simulators (Newborn Hal and Sim New-B.) This room also has A/V equipment for recording student examination and activities, along with several desktop computers that are used in conjunction with these simulators.
  • Six simulation bays house three high-fidelity human patient simulators (SimMan 3G manikins) and the cardiopulmonary patient simulator (Harvey). These bays have A/V equipment for recording student examination and activities, along with several laptop computers that are used in conjunction with the simulators.
  • A 32-seat classroom with fully integrated A/V equipment.
  • Control room used for Education Management Solutions (EMS) monitoring system with three full independent control stations that interface with A/V equipment throughout the entire simulation center and eight independent viewing stations for real-time observation.
  • A 20-person standardized patient seating area located immediately adjacent to the main lobby.
  • A 12-person standardized patient training room.

Simulation Center Equipment & Simulators:

  • (3) SimMan® 3G
  • (1) Noelle Maternal and Neonatal Birthing Simulator with Newborn Hal
  • (1) Sim New-B
  • (1) Sim Junior
  • (1) Harvey, The Cardiopulmonary Patient Simulator
  • (5) Female Pelvic Trainer
  • (4) Testicular Examination Model
  • (5) Rectal Examination Trainer
  • (2) Male Catheterization Trainer
  • (2) Female Catheterization Trainer
  • (3) Knee Aspiration Trainer
  • (3) Shoulder Joint Injection Trainer
  • (3) Lumbar Puncture Trainer
  • (3) Central Line Trainer
  • (3) Femoral Line Trainer
  • (3) Arterial Puncture Wrist Trainer
  • (2) Intubation Trainer
  • (3) Advanced Venipuncture Arm Trainer
  • (4) Breast Examination Trainer
  • (4) Eye Examination Trainer
  • (4) Ear Examination Trainer
  • (2) Birthing Model Simulator
  • (1) Pediatric Lumbar Puncture Trainer
  • Various supplies and equipment that complement the use of all the above items.

Education Management Solutions (EMS): A/V monitoring and recording system installed throughout the CSSC is used to record, score, evaluate and debrief student activities, examinations and competencies.

  • (2) Cameras in each exam room
  • (1) Camera in each team room
  • (3) Cameras in each simulation bay
  • (4) Cameras in the OB/GYN bay
  • (7) Cameras located throughout the hallways
  • All spaces have microphones for audio capture.
  • (3) Full independent-control stations that interface with A/V equipment throughout the entire CSSC. These stations include a desktop computer, microphones (wired and wireless), monitoring displays, and SimIQ software that allows programing, recording and monitoring of all activity within the CSSC.

Hours of Operation

The hours of operation for the CSSC are Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Badge access during hours of operation may be restricted due to scheduled curriculum sessions. However, students interested in using CSSC space or equipment during hours of operation are welcome to do so by making an in-person request and pending CSSC equipment or space availability. Arrangements can be made to accommodate any student who has reserved space within the CSSC in advance. Further information is available on the CSSC page via the Geisinger Commonwealth portal.

Equipment & Space Usage

Equipment and space is available for student use during business hours, as well as during selected non business hours. If a student would like to sign out CSSC equipment or space for personal use, he  can do so by contacting a CSSC staff member, via email or in-person, with the request. The full list of equipment that can be signed out of the CSSC is available on the Geisinger Commonwealth portal under Clinical Skills & Simulation Center. Standard loan time for equipment is 24‐48 hours, depending on the agreement made at loan time.

Access badges to the CSSC exam rooms are available during non-business hours at the main lobby security desk. Badges are available 5:30 p.m. to 12:00 a.m, daily, and also on Saturday and Sunday. Badges must be signed out and returned to the security desk. Prior reservations are not necessary to use non-business hour badges.

CSSC Staff

Diana Callender, MBBS, DM
Director of Clinical Skills and Simulation Center
dcallender@tcmc.edu
570-687 9694
Suite 3037 East, 525 Pine Street
Scranton, PA 18509

Mary Lawhon Triano, MSN, CRNP-C, ACHPN
Director of Clinical Skills
Medical Director of Clinical Skills and Simulation Center
mtriano@tcmc.edu
570-504-7307
525 Pine Street
Scranton, PA 18509

John L. Szarek, PhD, CHSE
Education Director for Simulation
jszarek@tcmc.edu
570-955-1322
3053 East, 525 Pine Street
Scranton PA 18509

Kathryn Powell, MA
Manager of the Standardized Patient Program
kpowell@tcmc.edu
570-687-9680
1 West, 525 Pine Street
Scranton, PA 18509

Antonio Pellegrino
Manager of Simulation Education & Operations
apellegrino@tcmc.edu
570-207-3682
1 West, 525 Pine Street
Scranton, PA 18509

 

Clubs & Organizations

Student Clubs and Organizations

Geisinger Commonwealth recognizes the contributions of student clubs and organizations that enhance the quality of student life and the college community. Clubs and organizations offer students the opportunity to participate in academic, cultural, social and athletic activities that are consistent with the development of knowledge, skills, values and attitudes expected from healthcare professionals. Numerous standing clubs currently exist; however, the Office of Student Affairs is always interested in meeting student needs and welcomes suggestions for starting new clubs.

Activities and functions of student clubs and organizations are considered college activities and therefore must:

  • Be registered with and approved by the Office of Student Affairs
  • Function in an organized manner consistent with the values, identity and mission of Geisinger Commonwealth
  • Comply with policies and procedures of the college
  • Be open to all students currently enrolled at Geisinger Commonwealth
  • Complete at least one service project per academic year
  • Have at least 10 enrolled students as members

Clubs & Organizations Listing

Starting a Club:

Club Funding & Fundraising:

Other Club Resources:

 

Counseling

The educational, physical and social demands of a medical and graduate school curriculum are uniquely stressful on students, often creating academic and psychological problems that could impact their medical/graduate education. Student Health Services is available to assist students in the preventive management of this stress. For students who present with the need for ongoing counseling services, community therapists are available to offer therapeutic behavioral health services. These services are accessed by a referral through Student Health Services and are provided to promote the personal and professional wellbeing of students. Individual, couples and group counseling is offered as appropriate. Services include, but are not limited to, ongoing therapeutic counseling, psychiatric therapy, psychological and neuropsychological testing, drug and alcohol counseling and crisis intervention. Students have access to local providers who are not faculty members of the college, thus assuring the provision of services with privacy and confidentiality. Furthermore, the exclusion of faculty members from the provision of these services ensures that the providers have no involvement in the academic evaluation or promotion of the students. In case of an emergency, students have 24 hour per day access to crisis counseling. As part of its personal counseling offerings, Student Health Services provides a series of wellness programs and initiatives designed to assist students in finding balance in their lives. Topics such as stress management, relaxation techniques, and effective coping mechanisms are among those offered.

Curriculum Overview

Year1

Year2

*2nd half of the academic year the schedule will flip (LIC students will move to block rotations and vice versa)

Disability Services

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine is in full compliance with the requirements of Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its implementing regulations (34 C.F.R. Part 36) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and its implementing regulations (34 C.F.R. Part 104). The school does not discriminate against qualified persons with disabilities on the basis of disability in its programs, services, and activities.  Students can request special accommodations by contacting the Center for Learning Excellence by completing a Request for Accommodations form.  Please see Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Policy for Disability Services that can be found on the portal for additional information.

Technical Standards (Medical Students)

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine is committed to full compliance with section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (PL 93-112) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA PL 101-336) enacted by Congress in 1990.

Qualified and accepted applicants to Geisinger Commonwealth must be able to complete all requirements inherent in and leading to the MD degree. To ensure this, the college has adopted technical standards for the assessment of all accepted applicants to the college. Because the MD degree signifies that the holder is a physician prepared for entry into the practice of medicine, it follows that graduates must have the knowledge and skills to function in a broad variety of clinical situations and to render a wide spectrum of patient care.

Candidates for the MD degree must have somatic sensation and the functional use of the senses of vision and hearing. Candidates’ diagnostic skills will also be lessened without the functional use of the senses of equilibrium, smell and taste. Additionally, they must have sufficient exteroceptive sense (touch, pain and temperature), sufficient proprioceptive sense (position, pressure, movement, stereognosis and vibratory) and sufficient motor function to permit them to carry out the activities described in the sections that follow. They must be able to consistently, quickly and accurately integrate all information received by whatever sense(s) employed and they must have the intellectual ability to learn, integrate, analyze and synthesize data.

A candidate for the MD degree must have abilities and skills of five varieties including observation; communication; motor; conceptual, integrative and quantitative and behavioral and social. Technological compensation can be made for some handicaps in certain of these areas, but a candidate should be able to perform in a reasonably independent manner.

Observation: The candidate must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences, including but not limited to physiologic and pharmacologic demonstrations, microbiologic cultures and microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states. A candidate must also be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision and somatic sensation. It is enhanced by the functional use of the sense of smell.

Communication: A candidate should be able to speak, to hear and to observe patients in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture and perceive nonverbal communications. A candidate must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech but reading and writing. The candidate must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all members of the healthcare team.

Motor: Candidates should have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and other diagnostic maneuvers. A candidate should be able to do basic laboratory tests (urinalysis, CBC, etc.), carry out diagnostic procedures (proctoscopy, paracentesis, etc.) and read EKG’s and x-rays. A candidate should be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide general care and emergency treatment to patients. Examples of emergency treatment reasonably required of physicians are cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the administration of intravenous medication, the application of pressure to stop bleeding, the opening of obstructed airways, the suturing of simple wounds and the performance of simple obstetrical maneuvers. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities: These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and synthesis. Problem solving, the creative skills demanded of physicians, requires all these intellectual abilities. In addition, the candidate should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structures.

Behavioral and Social Attributes: A candidate must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his/her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients. Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. They must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that should be assessed during the admissions and education processes. A candidate must readily be willing and able to examine any patient regardless of the patient’s age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, veteran status or political beliefs.

For more information, please contact the Office of Admissions or Jackie Ghormoz in the Office of Student Affairs.

  

Facilities

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine is located within the Medical Sciences Building at 525 Pine St., Scranton, PA. This building opened in May of 2011, and provides a state of the art facility conducive to academic and professional development.

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine is committed to creating a cohesive learning and study environment for its students. The College, along with its faculty and administration, has developed a strategic facilities plan to ensure that the students have a truly dedicated learning environment. Geisinger Commonwealth is committed to creating a supporting learning environment for Geisinger Commonwealth’s students, complete with dedicated study space, classrooms, study rooms, laboratories and library facilities.

Medical Sciences Building is a 185,000 square foot facility that will meet student and faculty needs.

The Medical Sciences Building was designed around the educational needs of our students and faculty. State of the art technology is in place and classrooms and small group rooms are easily accessible and comfortable. The Medical Science Building has 23 team rooms equipped with smartboards, study and lounge areas, a state of the art Clinical Skills and Simulation Center, a Gross Anatomy Lab that can accommodate 6 students at each table, a library and a café.

The building houses 60,000 square feet of research space (30,000 square feet is shelled) for investigator use. Core facilities in the new research space include a Bioinformatics Suite, and support space for post doctorate staff. Personnel in core facilities are supported by the College, as these facilities serve multiple researchers and are institutional resources. As programs develop and these facilities are more heavily utilized, core facilities will be partially supported by research grants.

 

Faculty

At Geisinger Commonwealth we have full and part-time basic science faculty that are committed to research and to providing an excellent pre-clinical education for our students. In addition, we have full and part-time clinical faculty members whose focus is the clinical education components that occur throughout the four years of the program. Some of these faculty members have cut back their clinical practices to assume responsibility for development and oversight of the curriculum, delivery of the core medical knowledge component of the M3 year, management of the regional campuses, and oversight of the clerkship experiences on the regional campuses. Geisinger Commonwealth is currently recruiting several additional faculty members in both the basic science and clinical departments for the upcoming academic year.

As a community-based medical school, Geisinger Commonwealth has engaged a large and enthusiastic volunteer clinical faculty to deliver clinical teaching over the four years. Volunteer clinical faculty members provide patient presentations, facilitate small group sessions, and serve as mentors in M1 and M2 years and as clinical preceptors in M3 and M4. Because of Geisinger Commonwealth’s method of clinical education described below, most volunteer faculty members who participate in the M3 year have educational responsibilities of only five to six hours per week; this time commitment has minimal impact on the physician’s clinical practice. M4 volunteer clinical faculty members have time commitments and responsibilities for students based on the number of students in the rotation. All faculty members are encouraged to participate in faculty development sessions that address issues such as best practices for maximizing productivity while providing quality education to students.

An advantage of our clinical education system is that faculty members are directly responsible for the vast majority of student teaching in the clinical settings and each student is always responsible to an attending physician. Interactions with resident physicians is also an important part of the students’ learning experience. Therefore, all students will work with residents during their M3 and M4 years and the residents who participate in the education of Geisinger Commonwealth students are invited and encouraged to attend all Geisinger Commonwealth faculty development sessions.

For a complete list of full time faculty, click here.

 

Financial Aid

The Financial Aid Office at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine (Geisinger Commonwealth) helps students identify the financial resources needed to achieve individual educational goals. While the primary responsibility to fund medical education rests with the student and his or her family, the staff at Geisinger Commonwealth is here to help find available resources to bridge potential gaps between the cost of attendance and available financial resources. Individual financial aid meetings are available to students with concerns related to loans, scholarships and debt management. Meeting with the financial aid office early will help build a financial plan that will be useful throughout a student’s academic career at Geisinger Commonwealth. In addition, it will allow the student to make sound financial decisions as they enter the workplace.

The Financial Aid Office maintains an open door policy to provide these services and meet the needs of Geisinger Commonwealth students. Students may stop in whenever questions arise or to obtain financial aid counseling. During busy times, appointments may be necessary. Questions may also be sent via email to financialaid@tcmc.edu.   Phone calls are also welcome.  You can contact Sue McNamara, Director of Enrollment Services at (570) 504-9628 or email smcnamara@tcmc.edu.

Federal Title IV Financial Aid Programs

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine is approved by the U.S. Department of Education to participate in Federal Title IV Financial Aid programs. Our federal school code is G41672. A complete review of financial aid eligibility requirements, frequently asked questions, timelines and more can found in the Financial Aid Guidebook,

Scholarships at Geisinger Commonwealth

There are a limited number of need-based awards funded by Geisinger Commonwealth for students enrolled in the MD program. Geisinger Commonwealth scholarships are based on verified financial need as documented through the FAFSA.  Geisinger Commonwealth scholarships may be awarded to students who have financial need after subtracting the student’s, spouse’s and parent’s contribution from the annual cost of attendance. The amount of these awards is determined by a variety of factors including approved funding levels and the number of qualified applicants.

There are also a limited number of scholarships established by donors that are selected by Geisinger Commonwealth’s scholarship committee based on the criteria designated by the donor.  If based on need and merit or need only, a FAFSA must be on file in order to be considered.

External Scholarships and Grants

There are a variety of external funding sources available to graduate and medical students. Some scholarships are easily obtained, while others are more competitive. Researching and applying for scholarships can be time-consuming but is well worth the effort, simply because the more scholarships or grants a student receives, the less he or she will have to borrow.

When considering private sources of scholarships, students may consider:

  1. Asking a parent’s employer about scholarship or low-interest loan programs for children of employees.
  2. Talking with a family doctor to become a mentor and assist in the search for funds.
  3. Contacting religious and fraternal organizations, as well as local service clubs like the local Rotary or Lions Club, if the student or student’s parent/spouse is a member.
  4. Contacting county or regional medical societies for potential scholarship assistance for medical students.

In addition, private external scholarships are posted on the Geisinger Commonwealth website and notices are emailed to students as information on private scholarships becomes available.  You may also want to look into free scholarship searches on the internet such as at www.fastweb.com .

If students receive any type of aid or benefit from an outside source, the Geisinger Commonwealth Financial Aid Office should be notified promptly. The total amount of financial aid a student may receive from all sources cannot exceed the cost of attendance for the associated degree program.

Eligibility for loans is based on the maximum amount that can be borrowed through the Unsubsidized Loan program and is limited by the student’s grade level. The following chart shows the maximum amount that can be borrowed by an independent student enrolled in graduate/professional programs:

Graduate Student

$20,500

(MBS program)

MD1 Student

$41,611

(9.5-month academic year)

MD2 Student

$40,500

(9-month academic year)

MD3 Student

$47,167

(12-month academic year)

MD4 Student

$42,722

(10-month academic year)

Aggregate Unsubsidized Loan Limit for Graduate & Professional Students

$138,500

 

Aggregate Unsubsidized Loan Limit for Medical Students

$224,000

 

Federal Direct PLUS Loan

The Federal Direct GRAD PLUS loan is an additional unsubsidized loan available to graduate/professional students. This loan can be borrowed in addition to the annual loan limits and can be used to help pay for educational expenses up to the cost of attendance minus all other financial aid. There is currently no aggregate limit on the GRAD PLUS Loan.

Note: GRAD PLUS loan borrowers cannot have an adverse credit history (a credit check is done at the time of application). If you are determined to have an adverse credit history, you may still receive a Direct GRAD PLUS Loan if you obtain an endorser who does not have an adverse credit history. An endorser is someone who agrees to repay the loan if you do not. The GRAD PLUS Loan can be endorsed electronically at www.studentloans.gov.

Interest Rates:  Grad PLUS loan is fixed at 7% for loans first disbursed on or after 7/1/17 & before 7/01/18
The Unsubsidized Loan is fixed at 6% for loans first disbursed on or after 7/1/17 & before 7/1/18.

Loan Funds

Loan funds will be disbursed to Geisinger Commonwealth at the beginning of each semester. One-half the approved amounts, less origination fees, will be sent to the college in the fall and one-half the approved amounts will be sent in the spring.

Avoid delays in receiving your loan funds by:

  • Completing your Direct Loan MPN electronically at StudentLoans.gov.
  • Completing your Direct Loan Entrance Counseling at StudentLoans.gov for your Direct Loan.
  • Completing your GRAD PLUS Application Request (credit check) at StudentLoans.gov.
  • If approved for GRAD PLUS Loan, completing your GRAD PLUS loan MPN electronically at StudentLoans.gov.

Applying for Financial Aid

To apply for financial aid at Geisinger Commonwealth students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov and include Geisinger Commonwealth’s federal school code: G41672.

MD applicants must include parents’ financial information on the FAFSA to be considered for Geisinger Commonwealth institutional aid, even though applicants are considered as an independent student for federal financial aid purposes. Ideally, students should complete the FAFSA as soon after October 1, 2017 as possible. All applicants who wish to be considered for need-based institutional aid must apply by March 1 every year and include parental financial information.

Late filers or an incomplete FAFSA will delay the process and will result in ineligibility for institutionally administered financial aid.

In order to be considered for Geisinger Commonwealth scholarships, the FAFSA must be submitted no later than March 1st.

  1. Additional information about applying for financial aid can be found in the Geisinger Commonwealth Financial Aid Guidebook.

Emergency Fund

Geisinger Commonwealth has a short-term emergency loan fund for students who are experiencing extreme financial difficulties. Typically, students would be expected to repay the emergency loan upon receipt of the upcoming semester’s loan funds.  Please contact the Financial Aid Office for further information and eligibility requirements.

Geisinger Commonwealth Cost of Attendance Worksheet for MD1 for 2017-2018

The institutional charges listed in the Cost of Attendance represent the amount that will be due to Geisinger Commonwealth for tuition and fees for the 2017-2018 academic year. The “Other Expenses” are indirect costs and are not billed by the college. However, they are still expenses that students do incur. They include items such as room and board, transportation, and personal expenses

Added together, the institutional charges and “other expenses” equal the student’s total cost of attendance for the year. This figure is used to determine a student’s eligibility for need-based financial aid and to determine the maximum a student may receive in financial aid, including all loans.

Living expenses (room and board) will vary depending on the student’s housing status. A student living on their own, and not in family-owned housing, will have higher living expenses than a student who is living with family and commuting from home; i.e. a student living with his/her parents/other relatives.

Please use this link to navigate to the Cost of Attendance information: https://tcmc.edu/students/financial-aid/cost-of-attendance/

Although a student’s indirect costs vary considerably according to individual means, lifestyle choices and budgeting skills, federal aid regulations mandate that financial aid offices develop annual cost of attendance budgets that define and limit expenses eligible for funding with financial aid. This Cost of Attendance budget provides for a modest but feasible student lifestyle in northeast Pennsylvania.

The individual student budget components are described in the Cost of Attendance section of the Financial Aid Guidebook. The Financial Aid Guidebook provide more detailed information on tuition and fees and the Cost of Attendance. Living expenses listed above are for independent graduate students not living with their parents. Living expenses will be less for students living with parents and these amounts are available from the Financial Aid Office.

Geisinger Commonwealth Diversity Statement

Diversity is a key driver to the fulfillment of our mission to graduate excellent physicians fully prepared to serve diverse patient populations and reduce prevalent health inequities in northeast Pennsylvania and elsewhere. To ensure Geisinger Commonwealth physician graduates are culturally competent and enhance their interest in the elimination of health inequities in the region, Geisinger Commonwealth seeks to add value to the learning experiences of all participants by providing a diverse and inclusive learning environment. The recruitment and inclusion of traditionally underrepresented minorities in medicine and biomedical sciences, specifically African American/Blacks, Latinos/Hispanics, Native Americans and certain Asians as members of our faculty, staff and student body is a Geisinger Commonwealth priority. With the assistance of the US Department of Health and Human Services, Geisinger Commonwealth established a Center of Excellence (COE) for Diversity to ensure the effective recruitment and retention of minority students. The work of the COE will sustain a pipeline from undergraduate, graduate and medical students to ensure successful completion of Geisinger Commonwealth’s MD program. To further Geisinger Commonwealth’s commitment to replenishing the physician workforce in northeast Pennsylvania, we have further expanded our student diversity goals to include NEPA/PA residents, economically disadvantaged and first-generation college students.

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine is committed to advance and sustain an academic and work environment that values differences. Geisinger Commonwealth’s leadership, faculty, staff and students share important responsibilities in the achievement and maintenance of an environment that reflects and sustains these important goals. The Office of the Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) will promote and support system-wide initiatives that enhance recruitment of a diverse student body, learning experiences and promote faculty and staff diversity in accordance with the goals specified herein. The Committee for Diversity & Inclusion (CDI), led by the CDO, promotes Geisinger Commonwealth-wide engagement; assesses our progress and recommends progressive steps, faculty, staff and student representatives. The CDI also discusses and reviews learning and workplace environments and works with the Geisinger Commonwealth community to further this important commitment.

Revised July, 2017

 

History

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine was established through the grassroots efforts of visionary individuals who foresaw what a community-based medical school would bring to the region and worked to make it a reality. Their goal was to provide more physicians and improved healthcare resources for the people of northeast and central Pennsylvania. The vision was to create a unique medical education experience that focused on caring for people in the context of their lives and in their community. 

The roots of Geisinger Commonwealth began in 2004 with the Founding Seven. This group included area physicians Charles Bannon, MD, Gerald Tracy, MD, and Robert Wright, MD; businessmen and community leaders Robert Naismith, PhD, and Gerald Joyce; and attorneys Mark Perry and Michael Costello. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Medical Education Development Consortium was established by 2005. The consortium included business, medical, community and government representatives. After acquiring funding from sources including the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania, and other state, federal and private philanthropic sources, the Commonwealth Medical Education Corporation was formed. 

The Commonwealth Medical College (TCMC) was incorporated in 2008 and welcomed its first class of Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree students and Master of Biomedical Sciences (MBS) degree students in August 2009. 

In April 2011, TCMC opened the 185,000-square-foot Medical Sciences Building in Scranton that houses the academic and research programs. 

The Middle States Commission on Higher Education granted TCMC full accreditation on June 27, 2014, and the Liaison Committee for Medical Education granted TCMC full accreditation on July 7, 2014. 

TCMC integrated with Geisinger Health on Jan. 1, 2017, and became Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. 

Geisinger Commonwealth has administrative and educational space at hospitals in Scranton, Danville, Wilkes-Barre and Sayre, as well as in Doylestown at the Pennsylvania Biotechnology Center of Bucks County. Geisinger Commonwealth has relationships with more than 25 hospitals in northeast and central Pennsylvania that provide learning environments for the students. The college has four regional campuses: North, South, Central and Guthrie, which are integral to the college’s community-based education. Community engagement is part of the fiber of Geisinger Commonwealth. More than 1,200 volunteer clinical faculty members throughout the region provide students with early clinical experiences and training across the four years of medical education. Families throughout the region are generous in allowing students to follow them so they can appreciate the social context and the impact of illness on the lives of patients. Students are required to pursue research projects in quality improvement and community health. 

Governance

Geisinger Commonwealth’s Board of Trustees (11 external members plus the college’s president and dean and a faculty representative, both non-voting) provides close administrative oversight of the college. The board’s commitment was identified as a strength in the 2008 LCME visit, and the board currently continues to provide sound organizational governance. The board, though small, is very committed to Geisinger Commonwealth’s mission. The board is in the process of identifying several additional members.  Trustees serve on and chair board-level committees, provide fiscal oversight and assist with planning the college’s future and fundraising.

The board of trustees reviews and approves the strategic plan, the budget, the promotion and tenure status of faculty members, goals and performance of the president and leadership team, and the granting of degrees. The board also approves new academic programs that Geisinger Commonwealth may add or develop, the purchase of real property, all audit and tax filings, and any major expenditures (over $100,000) not previously planned in the budget.

Funding

The school is funded by both public and private money. The primary sources of revenue are tuition, state support, grant support, philanthropy and funding from Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania (BCNEPA) (now Highmark). State funding has included a $1,000,000 grant for startup costs for the medical school, a $35 million capital grant towards construction of the medical education facility and yearly allocations in the state budget. Private funding from BCNEPA provided $45 million to fund startup costs including faculty salaries and the renovation of temporary space at Lackawanna College. BCNEPA also donated an additional $25 million to support construction of the new Medical Sciences Building, as well as operating costs. In addition, as referenced above, in 2011 Blue Cross committed up to another $54 million to close yearly funding gaps through 2017.

To date, Geisinger Commonwealth faculty have submitted more than 368 grant applications through the Office of Sponsored Programs, 101 of which have been funded, and have received $14.95 million in grant funding. Geisinger Commonwealth has invested approximately $7.3 million to acquire research technology and provide startup funds to faculty. The college will continue to aggressively pursue sponsored programs to strengthen and enhance research, academic and institutional programming.

In 2015 the college launched a major fundraising campaign, the Campaign for Scholarships and Innovation.  The board has endorsed a campaign goal of $15 million, most of which will be dedicated to student scholarships.

It is anticipated that the long-term sustainability for Geisinger Commonwealth will come from a combination of several sources, including state money, increased philanthropy, new degree programs, growth in medical school enrollment, and the development of clinical programs. In addition, Geisinger Commonwealth is pursuing opportunities through partnerships to reduce costs through shared services. The gap that must be bridged is not huge and it is expected these strategies will lead to long-term sustainability.

Student Housing

While Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine does not provide housing for incoming students, below you will find information and resources that may be helpful as you begin your search for housing.

Geisinger Commonwealth does not own property for students to lease. The School of Medicine has not inspected or investigated these property listings or property owners and does not endorse any of the properties listed.  Because the information contained in this listing was obtained from sources not associated with Geisinger Commonwealth, the institution does not accept or assume responsibility for the accuracy of the material, the condition of the properties for lease, or the terms of the lease agreement. 

Student Housing Resources Years 1 & 2

Throughout the application process, incoming students have access to an online portal page. This page includes a list of other Geisinger Commonwealth students who are seeking a roommate. 

Student Housing Resources Years 3 & 4

During the 3rd and 4th years of medical school students will move to an assigned regional campus to participate in clinical rotations. This will require students to secure new living accommodations in a new community.

Optimal posting time is between February and July. Your posting may take up to a month to be displayed.

For any additional questions, please contact Sharon Bednarz at sbednarz@tcmc.edu or 570-504-9635.

  

Library

Geisinger Commonwealth Medical Library provides the following services:

  • Access to information resources including a core collection of health sciences resources and tools licensed for all students, faculty, and staff.
  • 24/7 access to electronic resources via the library homepage.
  • Access to library staff seven days a week, including evening hours, during the academic year.
  • Orientation to library services and resources on demand.
  • Document delivery and interlibrary loan services.
  • Reference and literature search consultation services.

Library Facilities

  • 5,000 square feet, with silent areas for study.
  • 14 public access computer workstations and 14 laptop docking stations with plug-and-play capabilities.
  • Badge access: Students may enter the library 24/7 with Geisinger Commonwealth badge.

The Collections

The primary mission of the library is to support the information, education and research needs of the students, faculty, and staff of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. Our authorized users are provided access to Geisinger Commonwealth’s library website, where electronic library resources are available 24 hours per day, seven days per week. A list of Geisinger Commonwealth’s electronic resources can be found on the library website. The library is 95% electronic, with access to high-quality, evidence-based databases, e-journals, e-books and point of care resources. The library maintains a core print collection of more than 1,800 biomedical titles, including a Reserve Collection with all required and recommended textbooks for coursework. The library offers one-on-one training sessions, as well as a variety of small-group, hands-on classes. Online instructional tutorials, presentations and guides are also available on the library website.

Staff

Geisinger Commonwealth Library Staff includes a Library Director, Health Sciences Librarian, and a library assistant.

Library contact information: Please contact us at 570-504-9665 or library@tcmc.edu.

Medical Doctor (MD) Course Descriptions

M1 Year

MD 600 Cellular, Molecular Basis of Life 
This is a nine-week course examines fundamental genetics, biochemistry, and the molecular and cell biology of biological processes which are important for normal functioning of the body and its major organs. The course focuses on the clinical relevance of basic scientific knowledge and emphasizes common or representative human genetic diseases. Diverse teaching and learning modalities are used throughout the course. Clinical case lectures provide an opportunity for students to personally witness the impact of illness on families and healthcare professionals.

MD 602 Physician and Society 
This course is designed to introduce the scientific method as it relates to studies conducted in humans, where relationships and effects are often obscured by random variation. Emphasis is on the interpretation of the various student designs used today and the analysis methods used to evaluate the resulting quantitative data. The students will also be provided with an introduction to public health including occupational health, the U.S. healthcare system, administrative aspects of healthcare, preventive medicine, social influences on health and international health.

MD 605 Human Structure and Function 
Human Structure and Function is a 16-week course which takes students through the anatomical and physiological aspects of the human body using an organ systems based approach. Instructional material is presented in a multidisciplinary format which fosters the integration of the basic disciplines of anatomy, histology, embryology, and physiology. Students will be introduced to radiological anatomy and they will develop initial skills in the interpretation of different imaging modalities such as x-rays, CT, MRI, and sonography which depend on their ability to locate important geographic landmarks within the body. Integration of these disciplines is accomplished through lectures, podcasts, clinical case lectures, gross anatomy and physiology laboratories, and team-based learning.

MD 606 Neuroscience 
Neuroscience is a nine‐week course, which takes students through the science of the brain and its clinical applications for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of neurologic diseases. The instructional material will be presented in a multidisciplinary format to foster the integration of the basic disciplines of anatomy, biochemistry, histology, immunology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. The course synthesizes basic science and clinical aspects of information about the central nervous system to promote both the acquisition of fundamental knowledge and the development of clinical reasoning. The teaching modalities emphasize active student participation. The integration of these disciplines requires independent study, patient presentations, podcasts, problem‐based analysis of classic neurological disorders, team‐based learning, laboratory sessions focusing on neuroanatomy, and simulations in the Clinical Skills and Simulation Center.

MD 607 Foundations 
Foundations is a two-week course which introduces students to core concepts in the disciplines of immunology, microbiology, pathology, and pharmacology. Core concepts in these disciplines will serve as a foundation for understanding and examination of clinical presentations and pathophysiology which are the instructional setting of Neuroscience at the end of the M1 year and the Systems courses in the M2 year

MD 608 Patient Centered Medicine 
Patient Centered Medicine (PCM) provides students with opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to practice patient-centered and evidenced-based care in today’s healthcare environment. The course fosters the professional development of students in several key areas such as patient interviewing, physical examination, clinical skills, cultural awareness, bioethics (patient-centered values), human development, and human behavior. The course considers the essential features of a robust health system. Many of the topics discussed in these areas intersect with professionalism and inter-professionalism. The course emphasizes that a competent, patient-centered physician values the people they serve. PCM is year-long course which includes a range of learning opportunities such as lectures, panel discussions, case presentations, small group discussions, as well as practice with simulated patients, interactions with patients, workshops, mentoring, and self-directed exercises.

MD 609 Case Based Learning 1 
Case Based Learning serves as a forum for first year (M1) medical students to discuss clinical cases or healthcare issues. Students are organized into small groups (8-9 students). The goals of the CBL 1 are to (1) introduce students to a team-based experience, the purpose of which is to integrate content and activities of other courses in the M1 curriculum, (2) develop an investigatory approach to the discussion of clinical cases or healthcare issues, (3) foster self-directed learning, (4) provide students with strategies to identify their learning needs, (5) appreciate how basic and clinical sciences are linked to each other in the practice of medicine, and (6) appreciate how other facets of medicine such as professionalism, interprofessionalism, systems-based practice, and ethical behavior complement basic and clinical sciences.

M2 Year

MD 701 Systems I
Systems 1 is designed to provide instruction in the basic science and clinical foundation required for examination and treatment of disorders of the skin, muscles, bones, gastrointestinal system, renal-urinary system, and blood. Emphasis is on differential diagnosis, interpretation of tests and procedures, evaluation of results which draw upon an understanding of pathophysiology, and application of specific treatment interventions for the management of patients with diseases affecting these systems. The topics of quality and safety, medical informatics, economics and health affairs, cultural competency and diversity, ethics, interprofessional education, and family and community health are incorporated throughout the course, as appropriate. Systems 1 is organized in organ systems blocks, namely, dermatomusculoskeletal (DMSK), gastrointestinal (GI), renal-urinary, and heme. Each block lasts four to five weeks.

MD 702 Systems II 
Systems 2 employs the same pedagogical approach as that described for Systems 1 and is designed to provide instruction in the basic science and clinical foundation required for examination and treatment of disorders of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrine systems, reproductive systems in male and female subjects, and human development and behavior. Emphasis is on differential diagnosis, interpretation of tests and procedures, evaluation of results which draw upon an understanding of pathophysiology, and application of specific treatment interventions for the management of patients with diseases affecting these systems. The topics of quality and safety, medical informatics, economics and health affairs, cultural competency and diversity, ethics, interprofessional education, and family and community health are incorporated throughout the course, as appropriate. Systems 1 is organized in organ systems blocks, namely, cardiopulmonary (CP), endocrine-reproduction, and mind. Each block lasts four to five weeks.

MD 705 Art and Practice of Medicine 
Art and Practice of Medicine (APM) is a year- long course which builds on the concepts and skills initially developed in Patient Centered Medicine of the M1 year. Thus, APM continues the student’s development in patient interviewing, acquiring an accurate patient history, organ systems oriented physical exam, refinement of differential diagnosis, critical clinical reasoning and decision-making, cultural awareness, ethical, legal and moral issues of medicine, patient-centered values, professionalism, and interprofessionalism. APM devotes attention to issues of diversity and advocacy as they relate to elimination of healthcare disparities. An important goal of APM is to prepare students for the intense clinical training of the M3 year. As part of achieving the latter goal, APM provides a setting in which students consider the complex interactions of individuals (i.e. patients and healthcare providers), families, the larger community (healthcare systems, insurance systems, etc.) in the delivery of healthcare. To achieve this broad set of objectives, APM draws upon a diverse set of instructional methodologies which include interactive lectures, problem- and case-based small group learning, panel discussions, demonstrations, standardized patients, structured clinical exams, simulation, and Community Week activities.

MD 709 Case-Based Learning 2
Case Based Learning 2 serves as a forum for second year (M2) medical students to discuss clinical cases or healthcare issues. Students are organized into small groups in which they work through cases that complement content in the second year courses.   The goals of the CBL 2 are to: (1) integrate content and activities of other courses in the M2 curriculum, (2) effectively use an investigatory approach to discuss clinical cases or healthcare issues, (3) develop an effective team through communication and interpersonal skills, (4) foster self-directed learning by providing students with strategies to identify their learning needs, and (5) understand how other facets of medicine such as professionalism, interprofessionalism, systems-based practice, and ethical behavior complement basic and clinical sciences.

M3 Year

The Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC) and Blocks of the M3 year
The clerkships are divided into two main components: outpatient Longitudinal Integrated Curriculum (LIC) and inpatient blocks.  The two components are designed to deliver high-quality inpatient and longitudinal outpatient clinical experiences. In this model of clinical education, half of the third year students complete six months in the outpatient LIC followed by six months in inpatient block rotations.  Both groups switch format for the second half of the year.  Students are exposed to six (6) different core clinical disciplines (family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and psychiatry) throughout the duration of the M3 year. 

In the LIC, clinical training is accomplished by having each student work directly with practicing physicians (preceptors) in the setting of the preceptor’s office practice.  Students devote one-half day per week to each of the core clinical disciplines.  The LIC provides students a continuity of training which encompasses repeated interactions with the same group of patients, discipline specific outpatient practices, interactions with multiple members of interprofessional healthcare teams, and exposure to a variety of healthcare providers.  As part of the LIC experience, students will care for a cohort of patients (“continuity patients”) that they follow through various setting including outpatient consultations and inpatient hospitalizations.  Three uncommitted half days of the week, referred to as “white space,” are available for students’ self-directed learning and/or time to focus on clinical disciplines of special interest.  During the LIC students are exposed to Emergency Medicine, spending 80 hours in a local Emergency Department.

In the block component of the third year, students spend one to four weeks with an inpatient service, depending upon the discipline.  Students care for patients under a supervising attending.  In addition to the core disciplines, students complete a required anesthesia block and two weeks in a selective of their choice in either neurology/neuroscience, pathology/lab medicine, or radiology.   Upon completion of the required blocks, students have four weeks of electives in which to pursue a specialty of interest.

MD 800 Family Medicine Clerkship 
The family medicine clerkship, MD 800, is one of the six core clinical disciplines of the M3 year in the longitudinal integrated curriculum (LIC). Students will spend one half day weekly with a family physician in his/her office. They will follow the care of a group of patients over the course of the year in various settings which may include outpatient consultations, Emergency Room visits, and inpatient hospitalizations. The education and training of students in the Family Medicine clerkship of the LIC is done under the direct supervision of a volunteer clinical faculty member (clinical preceptor). By the end of the M3 year students should demonstrate proficiency in obtaining an accurate patient history and an organ systems oriented physical exam, a preliminary differential diagnosis supported by clinical reasoning, and formulation of an initial treatment plan. Development in these areas of proficiency should be guided by evidence-based medicine.

MD 801 Internal Medicine Clerkship 
The internal medicine clerkship, MD 801, is one of the six core clinical disciplines of the M3 year in the longitudinal integrated curriculum (LIC) and the four-week Adult Medicine block. In the LIC, students will spend one half day weekly with an internist in his/her office. They will follow the care of a group of patients over the course of the year in various settings which may include outpatient consultations, Emergency Room visits, and inpatient hospitalizations. The education and training of students in the Internal Medicine clerkship of the LIC is done under the direct supervision of a volunteer clinical faculty member (clinical preceptor). In the adult medicine block, students will participate in inpatient care under the supervision of a supervising attending.  By the end of the M3 year students should demonstrate proficiency in obtaining an accurate patient history and an organ systems oriented physical exam, a preliminary differential diagnosis supported by clinical reasoning, and formulation of an initial treatment plan. Development in these areas of proficiency should be guided by evidence-based medicine.

MD 802 Pediatrics Clerkship
The pediatrics clerkship, MD 802, is one of the six core clinical disciplines of the M3 year in the longitudinal integrated curriculum (LIC) and two-week pediatrics block. In the LIC, students will spend one half day weekly with a pediatrician in his/her office. They will follow the care of a group of patients over the course of the year in various settings which may include outpatient consultations, Emergency Room visits, and inpatient hospitalizations. The education and training of students in the Pediatrics clerkship of the LIC is done under the direct supervision of a volunteer clinical faculty member (clinical preceptor). During the inpatient pediatrics block, students will care for patients under the supervision of a supervising attending.  By the end of the M3 year students should demonstrate proficiency in obtaining an accurate patient history and an organ systems oriented physical exam, a preliminary differential diagnosis supported by clinical reasoning, and formulation of an initial treatment plan. Development in these areas of proficiency should be guided by evidence-based medicine.

MD 803 Obstetrics & Gynecology Clerkship
The obstetrics and gynecology clerkship, MD 803, is one of the six core clinical disciplines of the M3 year in the longitudinal integrated curriculum (LIC) and the three-week OB/GYN inpatient block. In the LIC, students will spend one half day weekly with an OB/GYN clinician in his/her office. They will follow obstetric patients through various settings including outpatient prenatal care visits, outpatient consultations, labor, birth, and postpartum care. Gynecologic patients will be followed through well-woman visits, gynecologic problem visits, emergency room visits, inpatients hospitalizations, preoperative care, surgery, post-operative care and outpatient consultations. The education and training of students in the OB/GYN clerkship of the LIC is done under the direct supervision of a volunteer clinical faculty member (clinical preceptor).  In the OB/GYN inpatient block, students will care for patients on the Labor and Birth and gynecologic surgery services under the supervision of a primary supervising attending. By the end of the M3 year students should demonstrate proficiency in obtaining an accurate patient history and an organ systems oriented physical exam, a preliminary differential diagnosis supported by clinical reasoning, and formulation of an initial treatment plan. Development in these areas of proficiency should be guided by evidence-based medicine.

MD 804 Surgery Clerkship
The surgery 804 clerkship is one of the six core components of the third year. The clerkship has two main components: the outpatient Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC) component and the inpatient Surgery block component. In the LIC, students will spend one-half day weekly with a general surgeon or surgical specialist in his/her office and will care for a group of patients in conjunction with the supervising attending. They will follow the care of a group of patients over the course of the year in various settings which may include outpatient consultations, Emergency Room visits, and inpatient hospitalizations. In the surgery inpatient block, students will spend four weeks in surgery with an assigned general surgery preceptor. The surgery block includes a one-week experience in anesthesia. By the end of the M3 year students should demonstrate proficiency in obtaining an accurate patient history and an organ systems oriented physical exam, a preliminary differential diagnosis supported by clinical reasoning, and formulation of an initial treatment plan. Development in these areas of proficiency should be guided by evidence-based medicine.

MD 805 Psychiatry Clerkship 
The psychiatry clerkship, MD 805, is one of the six core clinical disciplines of the M3 year in the longitudinal integrated curriculum (LIC) and three-week psychiatry block. In the LIC, students will spend one half day weekly with a psychiatrist in his/her office. They will follow the care of a group of patients over the course of the year in various settings which may include outpatient consultations, Emergency Room visits, and inpatient hospitalizations. The education and training of students in the psychiatry clerkship of the LIC is done under the direct supervision of a volunteer clinical faculty member (clinical preceptor). During the inpatient psychiatry block, students will care for patients under the supervision of an attending.  By the end of the M3 year students should demonstrate proficiency in obtaining an accurate patient history and an organ systems oriented physical exam, a preliminary differential diagnosis supported by clinical reasoning, and formulation of an initial treatment plan. Development in these areas of proficiency should be guided by evidence-based medicine.

MD4 Year

The M4 year is the student’s final year of clinical training toward achieving the MD degree. Students must pass the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) and Clinical Skills (CS) exams by the end of the M4 year. Students must complete 36 weeks of study during the M4 year. The 36 weeks is divided into 16 weeks of required courses and 20 weeks of electives. The following table outlines the specific courses of the required 16 weeks. A brief description for each of the required courses is provided below.

Course

Weeks

Medicine Sub-internship

4

Other Sub-internship

4

Acute Care*

4

   

Interprofessional Selective

2

Senior Seminar

1

Core Week

1

*The acute care requirement is fulfilled with four weeks of Critical Care.

In addition to completing their clinical training students spend varying amounts of time during the M4 year applying to residency programs and engaging in on-site interviews for residencies. One of the key points of the M4 year is Match Day, usually the third Friday in March.

REQUIRED COURSES

MD 900: Medicine Sub-internship 
All students are required to take MD 900.  This sub-internship focuses on the care of hospitalized adult patients. 

MD 901: Pediatrics Sub-internship 
This sub-internship focuses on the care of children on the pediatrics inpatient hospital service, the well-baby nursery, and in the delivery suite.

MD 902: Family Medicine Sub-internship 
This sub-internship focuses on the care of children and adults on the family medicine inpatient hospital service.

MD 903:ICU Sub- Internship

This sub-internship focuses on the care of the critically ill in the ICU. Please note that MICU, SICU, PICU all qualify as the MD 903: ICU Sub-internship Completion of this 4 week Sub-internship will also satisfy the Critical Care ICU requirement.

MD 904: Neonatal Intensive Care Sub-internship 
This sub-internship focuses on the care of critically ill infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

MD 905: Surgery Sub-internship 
This sub-internship focuses on the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of adult surgical patients.

MD 906: Obstetrics Sub-internship 
This sub-internship focuses on inpatient care of pregnant women including antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management.

MD 907: Gynecology Sub-internship 
This sub-internship focuses on the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of women on the gynecologic surgery service.

MD 908: Psychiatry Sub-internship 
This sub-internship focuses on the inpatient and outpatient care of patients on the psychiatry service. On-call activities include the evaluation of patients on the inpatient psychiatric services, crisis centers, and emergency departments. This sub-internship can be adult, adolescent, or child focused or some combination of these patient populations.

MD 911: Acute Care—Emergency Medicine 
A two-week rotation in emergency medicine in which students will routinely spend four, 12-hour shifts per week in an Emergency department.

MD 912: Acute Care – Critical Care 
A two-week rotation in an adult intensive care setting – students will spend time in an assigned ICU.  Students planning on entering residency in surgery or pediatrics may submit a request to substitute ICU in those disciplines. Students will work with core faculty with input from the multiple disciplines that work in this setting (respiratory therapists, etc). Students will interact with physicians of all specialties and will follow at least two patients at a time. Students will spend two evenings a week (until 11 p.m.) in the ICU.

MD 913: Acute Care – Emergency and Critical Care Medicine  
(fulfills the requirements for MD 911: Acute Care – Emergency Medicine and MD 912: Acute Care – Critical Care) This is a rotation that fills the acute care medicine requirement in one four-week block that combines the care of patients in the emergency department and intensive care unit. Students are encouraged to follow patients from admission in the emergency department to transfer into the intensive care unit. This rotation stresses the continuity of care through these two settings.

MD 915: Interprofessional Education (IPE) Selective 
All students are required to complete a two-week selective in a highly functioning interprofessional team setting. This clerkship requirement addresses the need for physicians in-training to understand the roles of all members of the health-care team and to function well within these teams. The IPE selective requirement must be fulfilled through this IPE selective course (MD 915).  This IPE selective can occur in a number of different settings allowing students to foster individual interest so that they can continue to develop the attitudes and skills necessary to practice medicine in a team setting.  Fulfilling the requirements of the IPE Selective at another site (including a Global Health site) requires preauthorization by the course director.

MD 919 Emergency Medicine Sub- Internship

The sub-internship in emergency medicine is considered an outpatient experience. This sub-internship focuses on emergency medicine and is currently only offered as an away rotation.

MD 999: Senior Seminar
A required one-week seminar that examines the issues of quality improvement and patient safety, biomedical ethics, health policy and economics, medical informatics, cultural competency and health literacy, evidence based medicine, and professional development as medical students transition to their roles as residents. This course is a self-directed study of a collection of articles and videos within the constraints of one calendar week during the M4 year. 

Core Week 
A required week devoted to both high-yield topics and formative and summative evaluation of students. This week will also address graduation requirements and the transition to residency.

ELECTIVE COURSES

MD 914: Teaching Elective 
The purpose of this elective is to have future physicians explore medical education at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. In this elective, fourth-year students can participate in teaching activities in the MD and MBS educational programs.  Each elective will be custom designed to meet the interests of the student enrolled and will involve one or more faculty mentors from the Geisinger Commonwealth MD and/or MBS curricula.

MD 920: Allergy & Clinical Immunology 
The allergy and clinical immunology elective is either an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will primarily follow ambulatory patients, but will also perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with atopic conditions and may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 921: Cardiology 
The cardiology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with cardiac disease. The focus will be on the non-interventional service, but may include time with the interventional service. Students may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 922: Dermatology 
The dermatology elective is either an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and management of patients with skin conditions and may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 923: Endocrinology 
The endocrinology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with diabetes mellitus and other endocrinopathies and may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 924: Gastroenterology 
The gastroenterology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with gastrointestinal conditions and may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 925: Infectious Disease 
The infectious disease elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with acute and chronic infections and may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 926: Nephrology 
The nephrology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation with an interprofessional team under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will interact with multiple disciplines involved in the care of patients with kidney disease and may spend extended evening time with the team in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 927: Pulmonary 
The pulmonary medicine elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform consultations for multiple services, including the ICU under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with pulmonary disease and may spend extended evening time with the team in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 928: Rheumatology 
The rheumatology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with bone and joint disease as well as connective tissue disorders and may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 929: Hematology/Medical Oncology 
The hematology/medical oncology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation with an interprofessional team under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will interact with multiple disciplines involved in the care of patients with malignant disease. Students will present a case at Tumor Board and may spend extended evening time with the team in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 930: Neurology
The neurology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation with an interprofessional team under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will gain exposure to EEGs and the interpretation of neuro-imaging. Students may spend extended evening time with the team in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 931: Pathology 
The pathology elective is either an experience without direct patient care. Students will participate in specimen processing, autopsy (if available), and morphologic and molecular diagnostics.  Students will participate in clinicopathologic conferences. Students participating in the 4 week elective will spend time in the hospital clinical laboratory. Students may spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 932: Radiology 
The radiology elective is either an experience without direct patient care in diagnostic radiology. Students will participate in the acquisition of imaging studies and their interpretation. Students will work with radiologists, nurses, and radiology technicians in an interprofessional setting. Students may spend extended evening time with the team in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 933: Interventional Radiology 
Students will perform pre-procedure evaluation of patients and participate in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students may spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 934: Radiation Oncology 
The radiation oncology elective is either an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation with an interprofessional team under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will interact with multiple disciplines involved in the care of patients with malignant disease. Students will present a case at Tumor Board and may spend extended evening time with the team in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 935: Ambulatory Outpatient Internal Medicine 
An extramural ambulatory internal medicine elective during which students will evaluate and follow patients under the direction of an assigned preceptor in a general medical office.

MD 936: Medicine Elective 
The medicine elective is a student-designed experience that allows the student to work within another area of interest within or outside of the Geisinger Commonwealth system. All electives must be approved by the medicine education director.

MD 937: Interventional Cardiology 
The interventional cardiology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow patients in the ambulatory setting, perform inpatient consultations and participate in the catheterization and electrophysiology labs under the direction of the assigned preceptors.  Students may spend extended evening time in keeping with the ACGME requirements.

MD 938: Diagnostic Cardiology 
The diagnostic cardiology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultations under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in the diagnosis and medical management of patients with cardiac disease with a focus on non-interventional, diagnostic cardiology.  Students may spend extended evening hours in keeping with the ACGME requirements.

MD 940: Pediatric Cardiology 
The pediatric cardiology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will interpret ECGs and echocardiograms. Significant travel is required for this elective. Students will spend extended evening time in the hospital or in the ambulatory setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 942: Adult and Pediatric Gastroenterology 
The adult and pediatric gastroenterology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow ambulatory patients and perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will observe and interpret gastrointestinal studies.  Students may spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 949: Ambulatory Pediatrics 
An extramural pediatrics elective requiring the approval of the Pediatrics Education Director.

MD 950: Pediatrics Elective 
The pediatrics elective is a student-designed experience that allows the student to work within another area of interest within or outside of the Geisinger Commonwealth system. All electives must be approved by the pediatrics education director.

MD 951: Pediatrics Neonatal ICU 
The pediatric neonatal ICU elective is an experience that focuses on the care of critically ill neonates in the intensive care unit. 

MD 953: Adult and Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 
The adult and pediatric allergy and immunology elective is an inpatient, but primarily outpatient experience. Students will follow patients in the ambulatory setting and will perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will interpret RAST testing, skin testing, pulmonary function testing, and participate in desensitization.  Students may spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 954: Adult and Pediatric Neurology 
The adult and pediatric neurology elective is an inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care facility experience. Students will follow patients in all of these settings and will perform inpatient consultation under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will interpret EEG and neuro-imaging studies. Students may spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 955: Psychiatry Elective 
The psychiatry elective is a student-designed experience that allows the student to work within another area of interest within or outside of the Geisinger Commonwealth system. All electives must be approved by the psychiatry education director.

MD 960: Urology 
The urology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow patients and participate in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of patients on the service under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will present at Urology case conference and will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 961: Otorhinolaryngology 
The otorhinolaryngology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience.  Students will follow patients and participate in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative care of patients on the service under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will conduct inpatient consultations under the direction of the preceptor. Students will present at Head and Neck Tumor conference and/or Tumor Board and will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 962: Anesthesiology 
The anesthesiology elective is an inpatient experience. Students will follow patients through the preoperative evaluation, the perioperative period, and the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) under the direction of an assigned preceptor. This is a more intensive experience than offered in the 3rd year. During this elective the student will develop more skill in the management of the surgical patient and performing procedures including airway and vascular access. Students will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 963: Orthopedic Surgery 
The orthopedic surgery elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow patients and participate in the surgical and ambulatory care of the patient with an orthopedic condition.  Students will participate in sports medicine and will present during the departmental rounds and will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 964: Ophthalmology 
The ophthalmology elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow patients and gain exposure to the medical and surgical treatment of ocular pathology under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will prepare a presentation for the department.

MD 965: Sports Medicine, Non- Surgical 
The sports medicine, non-surgical elective is an experience requiring the approval of the Medicine Education Director. Students will gain an understanding of how to correctly perform a pre-participation exam, the common overuses of musculoskeletal injuries, cardiac issues and screening in athletes, head injuries and concussions, as well as the use of herbal and prohibited substances. Students may spend extended evening time in the ambulatory or inpatient setting in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 966: Plastic Surgery 
The plastic surgery elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow patients and participate in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of patients on the service under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will gain exposure to patients requiring elective cosmetic procedures as well as complex reconstructive procedures. Students spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 967: Colorectal Surgery 
The colorectal surgery elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow patients and participate in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of patients on the service under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will see patients in the ambulatory setting, perform outpatient and inpatient consultations, and participate in procedures under supervision. Students will present at surgical case conference and will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 968: Vascular Surgery 
The vascular surgery elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will follow patients and participate in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of patients on the service under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will gain familiarity with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of vascular disease. Students will present at surgical case conference and will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 969: Breast Surgery 
The breast surgery elective is an inpatient and outpatient experience. Students will work with a preceptor whose practice specializes in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of breast disease. Students will participate in hospital rounds, perform consultations and procedures, and will present at breast cancer conference under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will attend surgical conferences and will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 970: Cardiothoracic Surgery 
The cardiothoracic surgery elective is an intensive primarily inpatient experience. Students will follow patients and participate in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of patients on the service with an interprofessional team under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will be a member of the team performing daily rounds, hospital conferences, and attending daily conferences. Students will spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 971: Surgery Elective 
The surgery elective is a student-designed experience that allows the student to either combine the surgical electives (MD 960-970) or work within another area of interest (such as transplant or trauma surgery for example) within or outside of the Geisinger Commonwealth system. All electives must be approved by the surgery education director.

MD 973: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 
The physical medicine and rehabilitation elective is an experience in both the acute care hospital and the rehabilitation hospital. Students will follow patients and perform consultations with an interprofessional team under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will participate in multi-disciplinary conferences. Students may spend extended evening time in the hospital in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 975: Geriatric Medicine 
The geriatric medicine elective is a primarily outpatient experience.  Students will follow patients in the outpatient setting, the hospital, rehabilitation medicine, the skilled-nursing facility, the nursing home, and in assisted living under the direction of an assigned preceptor. Students will work closely with all members of the health-care team in an interprofessional setting. Students will participate in multi-disciplinary conferences. Students may spend extended evening time with the team in keeping with ACGME requirements.

MD 977: Family Medicine Elective 
The family medicine elective is a student-designed experience that allows the student to work within another area of interest within or outside of the Geisinger Commonwealth system. All electives must be approved by the family medicine education director.

MD 978 Medical Spanish 
The medical Spanish elective is an independent study using online materials with text supplements designed to give students a working knowledge of Spanish terms that will be useful for history taking and physical exam of the Spanish speaking patient. Terminology is emphasized here rather than grammar. A previous foundation in Spanish is not necessary to benefit from and to enjoy this elective. There is a fee associated with this course that the student is expected to pay.

MD 979: Obstetrics and Gynecology Selective 
The OB/GYN selective is either a clinical experience that allows the student to gain additional experience in obstetrics and gynecology. Students must identify a faculty preceptor to supervise the elective. The elective may be taken within or outside of the Geisinger Commonwealth system. Requirements may be modified, but will generally follow the same guidelines established for sub-internships in Obstetrics and Gynecology.  All selectives must be approved by the OB/GYN education director.

MD 980: Advanced Anatomy 
The advanced anatomy elective is an experience in the general anatomy lab with a member of the clinical and basic science faculty. It is primarily designed for students entering surgical specialties; this elective will allow students an opportunity to perform advanced gross anatomy dissection.

MD 981: Basic Science Research 
student-designed experience in basic science research with a research mentor. The basic science research elective must be approved by the course director.

MD 982: Readings in Basic Science 
An experience with lectures and/or in depth reading in a student-selected field with a mentor. Students are required to write a paper (hopefully for submission for publication) at the end of the elective. The readings in basic science elective must be approved by the course director.

MD 983: Clinical Pharmacology 
An experience in a student-selected topic in pharmacology with an emphasis on mechanisms of drug action and how this relates to clinical practice.

MD 984:  Correctional Healthcare Elective 
The clinical correctional facility rotation enables students to develop clinical assessment and decision-making skills focusing on the medical and psychosocial management of the inmate population.  The goal for the student is to actively participate in medical care of the incarcerated patients. 

MD 985: Basic Science Elective 
student-designed experience under a faculty tutor. The basic science elective must be approved by the course director.

MD 986: Gynecology Selective (2 weeks)
The GYN Selective is a 2 week clinical experience that allows the student to gain additional experience in Gynecology. The elective may be taken within or outside of the Geisinger Commonwealth system. Requirements may be modified, but will generally follow the same guidelines established for the subinternship in Gynecology.

MD 987: Maternal-Fetal Medicine Selective (duration varies)
This selective is offered at the Geisinger MFM office in Forty Fort. This is primarily observing an attending in action rather than one where you operate independently. You will have exposure to all aspects of MFM including scanning, consults, genetic counseling and learning from the physician. You can participate in the weekly MFM learning sessions (Tuesday mornings).

MD 991: Research in Clinical Sciences 
student-designed experience in clinical research with a research mentor. The clinical research elective must be approved by the course director.

MD 992: Medical Humanities 
The medical humanities elective is a non-patient care experience that involves reading, reflection, writing and an interactive session with a course director.  Students will select one section of the anthology, a supplemental reading from the course selections list, and one selection from Pulse Magazine for each week of the course. Discussions of the readings and student writings are scheduled to meet schedule needs of the participants and course directors.

MD 994: Readings in the Clinical Sciences 
An experience with lectures and/or in depth reading in a student-selected field with a mentor. Students are required to write a paper (hopefully for submission for publication) at the end of the elective. The readings in the clinical sciences elective must be approved by the course director.

Revised: 7/15

 

MD Curriculum Details

M1 Year 
MD 600 Cellular and Molecular Basis of Life
MD 602 Physician and Society
MD 605 Human Structure and Function
MD 606 Neuroscience
MD 607 Foundations
MD 608 Patient-Centered Medicine
MD 609 Case-Based Learning 1

M2 Year 
MD 701 Systems I
MD 703 Systems II
MD 705 Art & Practice of Medicine
MD 709 Case-Based Learning 2

M3 Year 
MD 800 Family Medicine Clerkship
MD 801 Internal Medicine Clerkship
MD 803 Obstetrics & Gynecology Clerkship
MD 804 Surgery Clerkship
MD 805 Psychiatry Clerkship

M4 Year 
MD 900 Medicine Sub-internship
MD 901 Pediatrics Sub-internship

MD 902 Family Medicine Sub-internship

MD 903 ICU Sub-internship
MD 904 Neonatal Intensive Care Sub-internship 
MD 905 Surgery Sub-internship 
MD 906 Obstetrics Sub-Internship
MD 907 Gynecology Sub-internship
MD 908 Psychiatry Sub-internship
MD 909 Rural Family Medicine Sub-internship
MD 911 Acute Care–Emergency Medicine
MD 912 Acute Care–Critical Care
MD 913 Acute Care—Emergency and Critical Care Medicine
MD 915 Interprofessional Education (IPE) Selective

MD 919 Emergency Medicine Sub-internship
MD 999 Senior Seminar
MD 914-998 Electives

The majority of pre-clinical or “basic science” instruction (first two years) will occur on the Scranton campus. Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine has four Regional Campuses – Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Central and Guthrie — where the required third- and fourth-year clerkships occur.

Class Attendance

Students are expected to participate in all components of the educational program. Students are expected to be present, to be prepared, and to be on time. The attendance policy for each class activity is at the discretion of the course director. It will be contained in the syllabus for each course and explained by the course director on the first day of class. Students may be excused from class or clinical activities to seek medical and or mental health services. However, it is the responsibility of the student to report their absence in the absence tracking system on the portal under the student tab. Upon submission, the course director will be notified if the absence is excused or unexcused.  In addition, students need to follow up directly with the course director to make up the work/assignment(s) and refer to their course syllabi for more information on absences. This policy is meant to encourage a respectful attitude to members of the learning community and is consistent with our mission.

Sitting for Examinations – MD Program

Excused Absence

An excused absence from a scheduled examination will be granted only for serious personal illness, death in the immediate family or other similar extenuating event, or religious holidays. Students are expected to notify the Associate Dean for Student Affairs (or designee) of absence prior to the exam. This notification should be submitted to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs (or designee) via the absence tracking system found on the portal under the student tab. The Associate Dean for Curriculum (or designee), in consultation with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs (or designee), will approve permission for an absence from a scheduled exam. Students must take exam(s) within two business days of the originally scheduled exam date.

Note: Due to the nature of anatomy practical exams, students will not be excused from these exams.

Students must provide written documentation when attempting to secure this permission. For religious holidays, students must give advance notice to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs (or designee) and the Associate Dean for Curriculum. Documentation from the student health service (or its equivalent) is required for all illnesses. Written documentation of the circumstance must be provided to the satisfaction of the Associate Dean for Student Affairs (or designee) and the Associate Dean for Curriculum (or designee) upon return and prior to sitting for the exam.

Failure to obtain prior permission for the absence or to provide satisfactory written documentation within the two (2) business days will result in an unexcused absence and a grade of zero for the exam and the missed examination will count as the student’s first attempt. This will result in a retake examination during the remediation/retake exam week.

 

MD Grading Definition

Academic and professional performance is evaluated by written and oral examination and through observation in lectures, examinations, laboratories, recitation sessions, and all clinical and academic settings of Geisinger Commonwealth. Academic evaluations by the faculty and faculty committees are not limited to the assignment of examination scores and cognitive evaluations. Grades and narrative evaluations issued by the faculty and faculty committees are based on all requirements for the M.D. degree. These evaluations and grades, therefore, reflect the faculty’s judgment about the student’s cognitive performance, motivation, clinical skills, and professional behavior.

Performance in courses and clinical rotations are described by:

(1) In Years 1 and 2 the grades awarded are Pass [P], Fail [F]or Incomplete [I];
(2) In Year 3 the grades awarded are Honors [H], High Pass [HP], Pass [P]], Fail [F], or Incomplete [I];
(3) In year 4 the grades awarded are Honors [H], High Pass [HP], Pass [P], Fail [F], or Incomplete [I];
(4) Written narrative evaluations of the student’s work. Written narrative evaluations accompanying grades may contain notations as to whether academic and professional performance is on the level of “honors” (H), “satisfactory” (S), “marginally satisfactory” (MS), “unsatisfactory” (U), or “incomplete” (I).

(2) Grades and narrative evaluations are based on a complete evaluation of student performance in view of all requirements and standards of Geisinger Commonwealth and the course or clinical rotation. Grades (H, HP, P, F or I) are entered on the official grade transcript. Grades and narrative evaluations are part of the student’s permanent record, which is kept in the Office of Academic Affairs.

 

MD Student Competencies

Click here for information on MDStudentCompetencies.

 

Office for Community Engagement

Lead by the Vice President for Community Engagement, the Office of Community Engagement (OCE) promotes inclusion and effective engagement with communities to support their primary health related concerns. To date, OCE’s efforts have focused on external community engagement to further Geisinger Commonwealth’s:

  • Service to Community
  • Youth Development Programs (REACH-HEI)
  • Diversity and Inclusion (Summer Enrichment Programs)
  • Center of Excellence (COE)

Institute for Healthy Communities

Recognizing the myriad of health challenges in the region and beyond, Geisinger Commonwealth launched in 2016 it’s Institute for Healthy Communities (Healthy Communities) to address the region’s most pressing needs for reliable detailed health data, identify best practices and engage community and experts to develop innovative approaches to improve health literacy and implement innovative initiatives to improve health indicators in communities. Healthy Communities also provides the bridge to connect Geisinger Commonwealth students, faculty and staff to service opportunities meaningful to our communities. Healthy Communities also leverages the vast expertise present in Geisinger as well as our Health Services partners to reach the greatest amount of community members in meaningful ways.

 

Office of the President/Dean

Meet the President and Dean

Steven J. Scheinman, MD is president and dean of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, and EVP and chief academic officer of the Geisinger Health System. He is an exceptional leader with a broad vision, strong academic credentials and a commitment to student success, curriculum innovation, and community service.

Dr. Scheinman is an internist and nephrologist who has earned international prominence for his research into the genetics of inherited kidney diseases and kidney stones.  He has published more than 90 peer-reviewed articles, reviews, and book chapters on topics related to kidney disease and genetics. For most of his career he was principal investigator on grants funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), American Heart Association (AHA) and other agencies. He has been an invited speaker at numerous national and international meetings and a visiting professor at many prominent universities across the United States and abroad.

Dr. Scheinman has served on review boards for the NIH, American Heart Association, American Society of Nephrology, American Federation for Clinical/Medical Research, and National Kidney Foundation, among others. He is a fellow of the American School of Physicians and of the American Society of Nephrology, and is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

Dr. Scheinman is an advocate on healthcare workforce issues and matters affecting medical schools.  He was a gubernatorial appointee to the New York State Council on Graduate Medical Education, and has served on a number of advisory boards to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and national boards related to medical education. He is a member and chair-elect of the board of the National Resident Match Program.

Dr. Scheinman holds an AB, summa cum laude, from Amherst School in Massachusetts and received his medical degree with honors from Yale University. He completed his residency in internal medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospital; was chief resident in internal medicine at Upstate; and completed fellowships in nephrology at Upstate Medical Center and Yale-New Haven Hospital.  He was formerly professor of medicine and pharmacology at SUNY Upstate Medical University, where he served for eight years as senior vice president and dean of the School of Medicine.

Role of the President

The president is the leader responsible for the successful management of the school, achieving accreditation and providing leadership for the school’s missions of medical education, service, and research. The president is also responsible for supporting the governance structure, fundraising, and creating a constituency of support for the school. In addition to his administrative duties, the president is responsible for successful consensus building throughout the region. The president is the key representative of the school to donors, national organizations, potential research partners, clinical affiliates, and governmental agencies. The president of Geisinger Commonwealth:

  • Oversees all academic programs of Geisinger Health System including:
    • Medical education
    • Graduate education
    • Nursing education
    • Residency and fellowship programs
    • Non-degree health professions
  • Provides leadership to the school, the faculty, and staff in developing the vision and strategic plan for the school.
  • Is responsible for matters relating to the design and effective administration of the school, including facilities, resources, budgets, fundraising, and relationships with the community and external stakeholders.
  • Develops and leads an aggressive, long-term funding plan designed to ensure its viability in the decades to come.
  • Builds a culture of excellence in the school that incorporates fairness, integrity, respect, creativity, initiative, and community service.
  • Ensures compliance in all legal and regulatory requirements.
  • Ensures that the school follows all policies and procedures.

Role of the Dean

The dean is the chief academic officer and is responsible for creating successful academic programs and relationships with regional schools and universities, hospitals, clinics and physicians, businesses, industries, and individuals to create opportunities for academics, scholarship, and research. The dean is responsible for curriculum development and execution, the student experience, faculty recruitment and development and the execution of the research agenda. (Since the dean also serves as president, he has delegated many of these responsibilities to the vice dean.) The dean is specifically responsible for:

  • Building and ensuring the highest possible quality in medical, graduate and postgraduate education.
  • Managing and advancing the school’s partnerships with clinical sites and providers.
  • Recruiting a first-class senior leadership team to whom the dean can effectively delegate the key strategic and operational aspects of establishing the school.
  • Designing an effective administration of the school, including academic programs, faculty, students, and staff.
  • Building a culture of excellence in the school that incorporates fairness, integrity, respect, creativity, initiative, and community service.
  • Ensuring compliance with all legal and regulatory requirements.
  • Ensuring that the school follows all of its policies and procedures.

Orientation

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine takes pride in the attention given to assuring success in the transitions students face in adjusting to the medical and or graduate environment. Through a comprehensive and collaborative effort, students are welcomed to understand and live out the mission and values of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine hosts orientation every fall for our students.In addition to the initial orientation program for all incoming students, the Office of Student Affairs holds mandatory MD2, MD3, MD4 orientation sessions as students enter each year to ensure that they are prepared and supported for the next step in their curriculum and responsibilities as a medical student.

MD Orientation:

Incoming medical students can expect the following outcomes from active participation in the program:

  • A sense of familiarity and comfort with the school and opportunities to become acquainted with the local community. 
  • Opportunities for meaningful interactions with peers, returning students, faculty, staff, and administration to begin the process of promoting community.
  • Referrals for academic support based on outcomes of pre-matriculation assessments.
  • Models and the means by which students can become involved in the life of the college and achieve success in their academic life, social relationships, and out-of-class learning experiences.
  • A foundation for how the curriculum goals reflect our community-based, patient-centered, interprofessional mission of education and the ACGME competencies. 
  • Communication of the expectations of the school regarding academic responsibility and professional integrity, academic advising and career advising, exposure to infectious environmental hazards, immunization requirements, teacher-learner relationship, student mistreatment, student records, and disciplinary action policies.
  • An understanding of the resources available to support students in their holistic learning experience, including specific training and information about public safety, the medical library, information technology, diversity, counseling services, academic support, the student health center, and financial aid.

 

Other Programs: MD/MHA Program and MD/PHC and MD/MPH Programs

MD/MHA Program

Geisinger Commonwealth and The University of Scranton jointly offer a dual-degree program in Medicine and Health Administration. Medical students who know early in their careers that they wish to pursue healthcare administration in tandem with a medical career can apply to the program.

The program is the first in the region and one of only three programs of its kind in the United States.

The Doctor of Medicine and Master in Health Administration degree (MD-MHA) is an innovative dual program that combines the strengths of two highly specialized degree programs to train future physicians for roles as healthcare administrators and leaders in the delivery of healthcare services. As healthcare organizations respond to the dynamic changes in healthcare, the dual MD-MHA degree program will integrate leadership and management functions in the medical and clinical environment to meet the demand for delivering the most efficient and highest quality healthcare. The Master of Health Administration degree is accredited by the rigorous standards of The Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME).

The combined MD-MHA program is a five-year program that requires an additional 52 credits (44 coursework, eight field work) of study. The first two years are completed in medical school coursework, supplemented by courses in the summer at Scranton. Year Three will be completed entirely in The University of Scranton’s Department of Health Administrations and Human Resources. Years four and five will be spent at Geisinger Commonwealth for completion of medical school training. A 1,000-hour health administration residency is required after the completion of all MHA coursework.

Students interested in the program must apply and be accepted to both programs. Students applying for admission to the dual-degree program in Medicine and Health Administration must meet the standards and be accepted by both Geisinger Commonwealth and The University of Scranton.

Learn more about the MHA program at Geisinger Commonwealth and The University of Scranton online, by clicking here.

MD/PHC and MD/MPH

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, in partnership with East Stroudsburg University (ESU) has currently paused recruitment for the MD/Public Health Certificate (MD/PHC) and MD/Master of Public Health (MD/MPH) dual degree programs. Geisinger Commonwealth students have the opportunity to complete an 18-credit public health certificate program providing a foundation in core public health competencies, or a 45-credit Master of Public Health Program that expands upon these competencies. These two programs fully integrate public health training into allopathic medical education, and reinforce Geisinger Commonwealth’s mission to train the physicians of tomorrow in evidence-based, community-based, interdisciplinary practice. Partial tuition funding for public health coursework is available to eligible Geisinger Commonwealth medical students, made possible by a $1.5 million, 5-year grant from the Health Services Resources Administration (HRSA) that is scheduled to end in July 2018.

Geisinger Commonwealth students applying for admission to the public health programs must be in good standing and meet the admission requirements of Geisinger Commonwealth and ESU. The decision to fund Geisinger Commonwealth student tuition for public health coursework at ESU will be made by a Geisinger Commonwealth committee which reserves the right to discontinue or reinstate funding as necessary based on the grant annual budget. Pre-matriculating or first-year medical students are eligible to apply for either the MD/PHC or MD/MPH programs.

Geisinger Commonwealth associate professor of epidemiology, Mark White, MD, MPH, serves as principal investigator on the grant.

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number T85HP24464 Training in Primary Care Medicine- Interdisciplinary and Interprofessional Graduate Joint Degree Program for $1,499,592. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

The decision to fund Geisinger Commonwealth students to take public health coursework at ESU will be made by a Geisinger Commonwealth committee; this committee reserves the right to discontinue or reinstate funding as necessary.

 

Policy on Criminal Background Checks

Coming soon.

 

President’s Management Organizational Leadership

President’s Cabinet

Steven J. Scheinman, M.D., president and dean
Ida L. Castro, JD, vice president for government & community relations and chief diversity officer
Marise Garofalo, vice president for institutional advancement
William F. Iobst, M.D., FACP, vice president for academic and clinical affairs and vice dean
Venard Scott Koerwer, Ed.D., vice president for strategy, planning and communication
Anna Rusnak Noon, CPA, MBA, vice president for finance and administration and chief financial officer
Rebecca Slangan, MBA, executive office manager

Leadership Council

Steven J. Scheinman, M.D., president and dean
Tanja Adonizio, M.D., associate dean for student affairs
Patrick Boyd, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry and chair of faculty council
Diana Callender, MBBS, chair of clinical sciences
Ida L. Castro, JD, vice president for government & community relations and chief diversity officer
Joseph Cortese, SPHR, MS, associate vice president and chief human resource officer
Heather Davis, MFA, director of marketing & communications
Andrea DiMattia, MEd, associate dean for faculty affairs and faculty development
Michael Ferraro, M.D., regional associate dean, South Campus 
Marise Garofalo, vice president for institutional advancement
Jonathan Goldner, D.O., associate professor of medicine
John Gorczyk, director of facilities & public safety
William F. Iobst, M.D., vice president for academic & clinical affairs and vice dean
Venard Scott Koerwer, Ed.D., vice president for strategic initiatives and planning
Edward Lahart, MS, registrar and chair of staff council
Pamela Lucchesi, Ph.D., chair of basic sciences
Christine Meholic, MPA, director of project planning & institutional effectiveness
James Michaels, MBA, chief information officer
Andrea Mulrine, senior director of corporate and foundation Affairs
Sonia L. Planey, Ph.D., interim associate dean for research
Anna Rusnak Noon, CPA, MBA, vice president for finance & administration and chief financial officer
Michelle Schmude, Ed.D., associate dean for admissions, enrollment management and financial aid & assistant professor
Shubhra Shetty, M.D., regional associate dean, North Campus
Rebecca Slangan, MBA, executive office manager, Office of the President and Dean
Janet Townsend, MD, senior associate dean for regional campuses, community, and educational affairs/regional associate dean, West Campus
Thomas VanderMeer, MD, regional associate dean, Guthrie Campus
Carien Williams, JD, associate dean for curriculum
Elizabeth Zygmunt, director of media & public relations

Printing and Copying

Printing and copying is available for Geisinger Commonwealth students throughout the Medical Sciences Building and at the regional campuses and is accessible with a valid identification badge Copies are $.02 per page for black and white and $.10 per page for color. Students are given a $20 quota at the beginning of each semester and quotas can be replenished online using a credit card. Remaining balances left on accounts are not refundable.

Procedures Regarding Remediation of Classwork

MD Grading and Course Remediation

Pass is defined as:

Mean Score in course ≥ 70% AND an overall mean of 70% on medical knowledge exams. Students must attain a minimum of 65% on each medical knowledge exam and meet the minimum requirements, as designated in the course syllabus, for each component of the course assessment.

Failure is defined as:

An overall mean score of < 70% on medical knowledge exams

or

an overall mean score of ≥ 70% on medical knowledge exams but with an overall mean score in the course of < 70%.

Students with an unsatisfactory/failing grade will remediate the course.

Remediation for failing medical knowledge exams will consist of a comprehensive exam. Students must obtain a score of ≥ 70% on the remediation exam to successfully pass the course. If the student does not attain a grade of 70% on the remediation exam, the student will be referred to CAPS with a recommendation that the student repeat the academic year. Remediation for failing other required assessments in the course will be determined by the course director and remediation team (described below).

Incomplete is defined as:

Mean score in course ≥ 70%, an overall mean score of ≥ 70% on medical knowledge exams with an exam score of < 65%.

Students must retest on exams with scores < 65%. Students must obtain a score of 70% on the retest to successfully pass the course. If a student does not attain a grade of 70% on the retest, the student will be referred to CAPS for further action.

Grades will be reported with two decimal places with no rounding.

Remediation Plan – Phase One:

  1. Criteria for remediation and repeat academic year

M1:

Failure of 1 course    

No CAPS referral, student remediates and sits for remediation exam.

If student fails remediation, referred to CAPS for repeat year

Failure of 2 courses

Referred to CAPS for determination/recommendation to repeat year

M2:

Failure of 1 course  

No CAPS referral, student remediates and sits for remediation exam.

If student fails remediation, referred to CAPS for repeat year

Failure of 2 courses

Referred to CAPS for determination/recommendation to repeat year.

  1. Remediation
  1. Early Warning System – Intervention begins with first exam failure
    Determine personal/individual difficulties, monitoring of student progress
  2. Remediation Team – activated with 2nd exam failure to begin working directly with student
  3. Development of Lifelong Learning Course – systematically explore learning strategies through discussion of course content topics, including the creation of student products, discussion of practice questions. Open to all students, however, those with two exam failures must participate.
  4. Remediation exams will be comprehensive with new exam items. All remediation will be in the same format as course exams and will be administered during designated remediation weeks after the conclusion of the academic year
  5. Students Repeating the Academic year
    Student’s schedule is determined on individual basis. Ex.: student passing CBL II and APM may not have to retake these courses.

Remediation Team – will monitor and oversee student progress

Student will be on academic probation. Any course failure will result in dismissal

Regional Campus Organization

Regional Campus Organization

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Leadership at Regional Campuses

Geisinger Commonwealth Regional Campuses have the leadership, faculty, staff and infrastructure to support the students and the curriculum.

North Campus

Regional Associate Dean 
Shubhra Shetty, MD
525 Pine St.
Scranton, PA 18509
Office: 570-504-9623
Fax: 570-504-9063
E-mail: sshetty@tcmc.edu

Regional Assistant Dean
Lisa Thomas, MD
525 Pine St.
Scranton, PA 18509
Office: 570-955-1315
Fax: 570-504-9063
E-mail: lthomas01@tcmc.edu

Regional Manager 
Nora E. Alu
525 Pine St.
Scranton, PA 18509
Office: 570-207-3681 ext. 1351
Fax: 570-504-2812
E-mail: nalu@tcmc.edu

Regional Education Specialist
Elizabeth McGill, PhD
525 Pine St.
Scranton, PA 18509
Office: 570-504-9624 ext. 1264
Fax: 570-504-2812
E-mail: emcgill@tcmc.edu

South Campus

Regional Associate Dean 
Michael Ferraro, MD
Wilkes- Barre General Hospital
575 N River Street, Saidman Hall – Ground Floor
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18764
Office: 570-825-7246
Fax: 570-825-7266
E-mail: mferraro@tcmc.edu

Regional Assistant Dean 
Mary Beth Sokach, DO
Wilkes- Barre General Hospital
575 N River Street, Saidman Hall – Ground Floor
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18764
Office: 570-388-6151
Fax: 570-825-7266
E-mail: msokach@tcmc.edu

Regional Education Specialist
Melissa Ide, MS
Wilkes- Barre General Hospital
575 N River Street, Saidman Hall – Ground Floor
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18764
Office:  570-825-7247
Fax: 57570 – 504-2813
E-mail: mide@tcmc.edu

Regional Manager 
Jackie Castanzo
Wilkes- Barre General Hospital
575 N River Street, Saidman Hall – Ground Floor
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18764
Office: 570-825-7245
Fax: 570-825-7266
E-mail: jcastanzo@tcmc.edu

Central Campus

Interim Regional Associate Dean
Janet Townsend, MD
Geisinger Medical Center
100 N. Academy Avenue
Danville, PA 17822
271-555-4874
E-mail: jtownsend@tcmc.edu

Regional Assistant Dean 
Mark Olaf, DO
Geisinger Medical Center
100 N. Academy Avenue
Danville, PA 17822
E-mail: molaf@geisinger.edu

Regional Education Specialist
Jill M. Taggart
Geisinger Medical Center
100 N. Academy Avenue
Danville, PA 17822
570-214-1634
E-mail: jtaggart@tcmc.edu 

Regional Manager
Tammy Button
Geisinger Medical Center
100 N. Academy Avenue
Danville, PA 17822
570-214-2720
E-mail: tbutton@tcmc.edu

Guthrie Campus

Regional Associate Dean
Thomas VanderMeer, MD
Guthrie
One Guthrie Square
Sayre, PA 18840
Office:  570-887-3580
Email: vandermeer_thomas@guthrie.org

Regional Assistant Dean

James Walsh, MD
Guthrie
One Guthrie Square
Sayre, PA 18840
Office:  570-887-2469
Email: walsh_james@guthrie.org

Regional Education Specialist
Nancy Pease

Guthrie
One Guthrie Square
Sayre PA 18840
Office: 570-877-4434
Email: pease_nancy@guthrie.org

Guthrie Student Coordinator
Kyle Williams
Guthrie
One Guthrie Square
Sayre PA 18840
Office: 570-877-4434
Email: williams_kyle@guthrie.org

 

Regional Campuses

Geisinger Commonwealth employs a distributive model of medical education with four regional campuses (North, South, Central and Guthrie) to provide students with experiences in diverse clinical settings and to assure robust and comparable learning environments for all students

All students will matriculate during the M1 and M2 years on the North Campus. Students will complete studies in the M3 year in a regional campus and if they choose, various required and elective rotations in in their M4 year may also be at a regional campus. Geisinger Commonwealth’s state of the art technology will assist each student in maintaining connectivity to Geisinger Commonwealth resources regardless of geographical location, and assure consistency in educational experiences.

These communities and hospitals each sponsor residency programs that are closely affiliated with Geisinger Commonwealth and each provides clinical experiences for medical students and other health professional students that facilitate the development of Geisinger Commonwealth students.

Agreements and Clinical Partners:

Geisinger Commonwealth has affiliation agreements with multiple hospitals or healthcare facilities that are experienced in medical education and that serve a diverse medical and demographic population. Our major clinical partners include:

  • North: Moses Taylor Hospital, Regional Hospital of Scranton, Geisinger Community Medical Center, Allied Health Services, Scranton Counseling Center, Wayne Memorial Hospital, Tyler Memorial Hospital, Wayne Community Health Center, and Endless Mountain Health System.
  • South: Wilkes-Barre General Hospital ( Commonwealth Health [CHS]), Wilkes-Barre Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center, Lehigh Valley Hospital Hazleton, Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Berwick Hospital Center (CHS), Geisinger Bloomsburg Hospital, Children’s Service Center of Wyoming Valley, Gnaden Huetten Memorial Hospital (Blue Mountain Health System), Northeast Counseling Service, Palmerton Hospital (Blue Mountain Health System, Allied Services/John Heinz Institute, Riverview Ambulatory Surgical Center and Schuylkill Health System.
  • Central: Geisinger Medical Center, Evangelical Hospital.
  • Guthrie: Guthrie Corning Hospital, Guthrie Robert Packer Hospital, Big Flats, Corning Centerway, Corning Steuben, Guthrie practices in Ithaca and Waverly. New York and Wellsboro, PA.

In addition, Geisinger Commonwealth maintains affiliation agreements with many hospitals and health systems around the region and country to enable students to participate in away electives during the fourth year.

An integrated, competency-based curriculum has been developed. Clinical education begins during the first year of study, during which time students may visit regional campuses, be assigned a volunteer family to follow, and experience the clinical setting. Clinical experiences have been developed to provide students with training in an inter-professional setting by working with health professional training programs at regional colleges and universities. Learning together with other health professional students provides our students with an understanding of the critical role of these health professionals in coordinating and improving quality of care. Each of our affiliated hospitals participates in the delivery of allied health professional education which facilitates these experiences.

Students will gain experience in community health improvement projects throughout their medical school experience. Students will spend time during six separate weeks in the first two years working on public health projects in the community. Working in community settings and in rural areas will help students develop an awareness of and appreciation for the impact of the needs of the society at large and specific populations in particular on healthcare demand and the provision of services. Students apply knowledge about patient safety and quality improvement by conducting quality improvement projects under the direction clinical community partners during the third year. Numerous opportunities for student involvement in clinical and community health research projects are available in the regions.

The college will focus its efforts over the next decade developing programs across the continuum of education. “Pipeline” programs (aimed at middle and high school students) have been created to encourage students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds to consider health professional careers. Geisinger Commonwealth continues to work with regional colleges and universities to establish these programs at the middle, high school and the collegiate level for prospective medical students. In addition, Geisinger Commonwealth is working to expand and establish new graduate medical education programs to provide our students with greater opportunities for advanced training in our region.

Regional Campus Development

Geisinger Commonwealth continues to meet with regional hospitals and medical staffs to explore interest in Regional Campus Affiliations in order to develop affiliations with clinical partners in other regions. Geisinger Commonwealth maintains an ongoing program in clinical faculty recruitment and development, and has instituted all needed student support services at each clinical campus. Students have numerous opportunities for community involvement and service in each region, through strong regional partnerships. Currently, more than 1200 physicians have been appointed to Geisinger Commonwealth volunteer clinical faculty.

Roles and Responsibilities:

Vice President for Academic and Clinical Affairs and Vice Dean
The vice dean is responsible for the oversight and administration of all of Geisinger Commonwealth Regional Campuses.  The vice dean works with the senior associate dean for regional campuses, educational affairs and community and the regional associate deans to ensure all of the educational goals, objectives and clinical partnerships are maintained.

Regional Associate Deans
The Regional Associate Dean is the academic and administrative leader of the regional campus, directing all regional activities, representing Geisinger Commonwealth to the regional sponsors and to Geisinger Commonwealth bodies, providing input and feedback on the regional learning experience. The Regional Associate Dean is responsible for assuring that the curriculum is implemented in each region in a way that all students meet learning goals, and that appropriate student support and access to extracurricular activities are provided. The Regional Associate Dean leads the regional team which consists of the Regional Assistant Dean, the Regional Education Specialist, the Regional Manager and the Regional Education Coordinators in six core disciplines.

Assistant Chairs for Specialty Education:
The assistant chair for specialty education is ultimately responsible for all content and activities associated with the clerkships and rotations, including establishing the educational goals for the clerkship, organizing clinical and didactic activities, and ensuring that these activities meet stated goals. The assistant chair works in conjunction with the clinical chair, regional associate deans, regional assistant deans, regional education coordinators, and clinical faculty to develop and deliver the educational content of the clerkship. In addition, the assistant chair works to ensure comparability for the clerkship at all sites and has responsibility for ongoing review and revision of the clerkship experience. The assistant chair serves as the chair of his/her respective grading committee and works with the regional education coordinators in assigning student grades for the clerkship.

Regional Education Coordinators/Clerkship Directors:
The regional education coordinator (REC)/clerkship directors are responsible for the coordination of all local educational activities for the discipline at his/her respective clinical regional campus, including the implementation of the curricular goals and ensuring that all activities are fulfilling these goals. The REC/clerkship director is responsible for the recruitment and evaluation of faculty in the region for the clerkship. The REC/clerkship director serves as a primary regional contact for students in a specific clerkship. All RECs/clerkship directors serve as members of their respective grading committees.

Regional Assistant Dean:
The Regional Assistant Dean (RAD) works with the regional associate dean and specialty education directors to ensure that all clinical activities in the region are functioning in a coordinated fashion. This individual is responsible for working with regional education coordinators/clerkship directors across the disciplines to ensure that each student fulfills educational goals. The RAD serves as a primary contact for students assigned to a specific region. The RAD mentors and motivates students, monitors their progress, and assists students requiring remediation or counseling. The RAD has no role in assigning grades for any clerkship, but may intervene in global student performance issues such as in the domain of professionalism. 

Regional Education Specialist:
The regional education specialist (RES) is the initial and primary point of contact for students during their third year. The RES will produce schedules for each student’s activities, clarify scheduling issues, and address educational or logistical concerns. In addition, the RES will work with the preceptors and RECs in each discipline to help ensure that objectives are being met. The RES will manage Friday CEDs, monitor attendance and coordinate evaluations for the students and the preceptors. The RES will also work in association with Student Affairs.

Clinical Preceptors:
The volunteer clinical faculty for the clerkship will work with the student on a weekly (in person) and daily (through phone and email) basis to collaborate in the care of the students’ patients. The faculty is the initial point of contact for the student, and is responsible for reporting, to the regional assistant dean, any issues a student may be having with meeting the learning objectives. The faculty is responsible for providing a welcoming and supportive learning environment for the student, identifying gaps the students may have, and helping to direct the student towards resources for self-directed learning to fill these gaps. He/she is also responsible for setting the highest example of professionalism and life-long learning for Geisinger Commonwealth students.

Student Affairs Staff:
The Student Affairs staff provide referrals for counseling, student health, academic support and career advising, coordinates student housing, service and community building activities, assists with the implementation of the four year career curriculum in PCM, APM, CED and Core Weeks, coordinates MD3 regional orientations, and coordinates credentialing with clinical affiliates. 

 

  

Research Opportunities and Summer Internships

Summer Opportunities: Research, Teaching and Clinical Internships & Other Experiences

Geisinger Commonwealth students have approximately two months of free time between the end of the first year in June and the beginning of the second year in August. This period is a wonderful opportunity for students to plan for activities that will best suit their personal and professional goals. Some will choose to spend time on vacation with family, loved ones, or friends or to travel, in order to refresh and reconnect; others choose internships with opportunities for clinical experiences that may build knowledge, skills or help with later career choice; some choose to spend the summer in a service experience, contributing to communities here and abroad; and others decide to engage in research opportunities available at Geisinger Commonwealth through the Summer Research Immersion Program (SRIP) or at other institutions such as the NIH. Faculty members and Student Affairs staff collaborate to identify and publicize a variety of summer possibilities for Geisinger Commonwealth students. A listing of available internships and other experiences will be distributed by late December and on an ongoing basis by the Student Affairs office and is updated as we receive notice of other opportunities. Applications for various internships are usually due between January and April 15th.

Below is a brief description of the types of opportunities that are available.

Clinical Internships and Experiences: A number of clinical internships, exposing students to a variety of medical disciplines and practice settings are usually available in the region. A grant funded internship in rural primary care is sponsored through the clinical departments and the Northeast Pennsylvania Area Health Education Center (AHEC). Additional internships are sponsored at academic medical centers throughout the country, ranging from two to eight weeks in length, sometimes focusing on specific clinical areas such as substance abuse treatment. Professional and student organizations often list such opportunities on their websites. These opportunities will be publicized to the class by Student Affairs in the December listing and as we receive notice.

Research Internships: Geisinger Commonwealth sponsors approximately 35 stipend-supported research internships for rising M2 students as part of an eight-week Summer Research Immersion Program. Throughout the program, students work directly with a faculty mentor and research team on specific projects that include translational scientific research in the laboratory setting or public health, community, and clinical research in the clinical or community setting. The program culminates in a Summer Research Symposium where students present their work to the community. A formal application process in the late winter/early spring is conducted. In addition, a number of pre-matriculated students also participate in the Summer Research Immersion Program through the Summer Enrichment Program.

Additionally, many federal and state agencies, including the NIH and CDC, as well as some academic medical centers, sponsor summer research opportunities for medical students. A formal application process is required with due dates between January and March. Opportunities will be publicized as early as possible. Students are advised to meet with their academic advisor or a faculty member in the relevant field to review their applications. Please contact Elizabeth Kuchinski, MPH, or Dr. Sonia Lobo Planey in the Office of Research for assistance with external research opportunities.

Community Service Opportunities: Opportunities to participate in community service activities and to make a significant contribution to the health of northeast Pennsylvania and other communities abound. Students may choose to fulfill part of their Geisinger Commonwealth service requirement during the summer, may continue activities in which they participated in the year or to pursue some structured service learning opportunities here, in other parts of the U.S., or abroad. There are many directories of such opportunities. The Office of Community Engagement and Equity, in collaboration with Student Affairs and the Department of Family Community and Rural Health have relationships with numerous community partners and can assist you in finding an opportunity to contribute your time and talents.

Global Health Opportunities: Many opportunities exist for education, service or research projects around the world. Sometimes students choose such experience in order to enhance their skills in another language, such as Spanish, or to learn more about different models of healthcare delivery. Dr. Karen Arscott has significant international health experience and is responsible for identifying opportunities for students to participate in international educational, service or research opportunities. Often such opportunities require that the student fund their own trip. Interested students should contact Dr. Arscott to learn about and review such opportunities.

Teaching Opportunities: Most summers a number of stipend supported positions are available for medical student teaching assistantships in the Gross Anatomy Lab (GAL) teaching physician assistant and physical therapy students enrolled in programs at Marywood University and the University of Scranton. Application for these positions is coordinated through Dr. Ying Ju Sung, the Director of the GAL..

Education and Scholarship: Occasional opportunities exist to work on curricular projects or to enhance academic skills such as teaching and writing. Students who would like to write up a previous research project; try their hand at publishing narrative pieces such as reflective essays about their experiences; conduct a comprehensive literature or evidence-based review (such as Cochrane Review); work on a Geisinger Commonwealth curriculum project; or apply for a funded opportunity (such as Gold Foundation awards for curricular projects in humanism) are encouraged to contact a faculty member, department chair, or Dr. Sonia Planey in the Office of Research.

Finally, students should keep in mind that any of the above activities, carried out with commitment to service and excellence, will enrich your experience and add to your resume for residency selection. We advise students to choose a summer plan that best supports their personal interests and growth.

 

Safety/Security

Geisinger Commonwealth is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for students, faculty, staff and visitors. At the beginning of each year, during student orientation, the Director of Facilities & Public Safety will attend and educate the students on safety and security measures. In addition, the student/faculty population will be encouraged to participate in crime prevention throughout campus. Information on safety and security concerns and precautions will be provided to all students, faculty and staff at various times throughout the school year. The information and guidance will be relayed to the group via seminars, films, bulletins, crime alerts, posters, brochures, newsletters and any other methods deemed necessary. Geisinger Commonwealth buildings will be properly secured each day to safeguard both individuals and Geisinger Commonwealth property. Only faculty, staff and students who possess proper identification will be admitted to the space after hours. Each authorized student, faculty/staff member will be issued a picture identification card which will also control admittance to Geisinger Commonwealth educational space. Visitors will receive a temporary ID card which will be required to be surrendered at the end of the visit. The areas of admittance will be limited to the areas necessary to perform job functions, or visit with a desired party. Video monitoring throughout the building takes place at all times.

The Medical Sciences Building is equipped with a card access/entry control system. The building has 24/7 identification card access. Geisinger Commonwealth has contracted with Krayer Security to provide security coverage in the building. Krayer is an established security provider with a demonstrated history of success. Multiple security cameras are in place throughout the building which will be monitored by the on duty security officer. Public Safety provides regular patrol of the college buildings as well as parking areas. In addition, the Security personnel will escort students and faculty after hours around the building or to parking areas as needed. Although the Public Safety Department is not a police agency, the department works in conjunction with the Scranton Police Department, and appropriate regional law enforcement agencies in all matters relating to reportable incidents.

Lost and Found

Any lost items will be held at the Public Safety desk at the main entrance. You may be required to produce identification to retrieve the item.

Lockers

There are lockers available on the 4th floor East wing of the MSB. Students are required to bring their own lock, and inform Facilities & Public Safety of their locker selection. Lockers are available on a first come basis.

Campus Safety

This section is produced for the general safety and welfare of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine community.

It is also designed to meet the requirements of:

  • The Federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998 (formerly the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990)
  • The Higher Education Amendments of 1992
  • The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (PA Law 101-226)
  • Uniform Crime Reporting Act (Act 180 of 2004)
  • Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexual Violent Offender Registration Act
  • The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000

How to report Criminal Incidents and other Emergencies

Geisinger Commonwealth has contracted with Krayer Security to provide Public Safety coverage. Each member of the Geisinger Commonwealth community has the right to be free from victimization and all members are expected and required to comply with all federal, state, and local laws. To report a crime or emergency, contact the Geisinger Commonwealth Public Safety Office at (570) 558-2300 or extension 2300 from any on campus phone. The number is staffed 24 hours a day by Public Safety Officers. The Public Safety office will investigate all complaints.
To report a crime/emergency to local or state police, dial 9-911. The 911 system is available for everyone in the community.

Anonymous Reporting

A person may want to consider filing an anonymous report. The purpose of an anonymous report is to take steps to ensure the future safety of the reporting person and others, while protecting her/his identity. The College can use such information to maintain accurate information regarding the number of reported incidents, look for patterns/trends of activity, and alert the college community to potential danger.
If a person wishes to files an anonymous report, they may contact the Geisinger Commonwealth Director of Facilities & Public Safety, or the Public Safety office. An anonymous third party report containing information regarding the incident will be completed, however no names or identifying information will be used without consent of the victim. The report will be forwarded to the Public Safety Office.

Daily Crime Log

The Public Safety Office maintains a daily crime log, which is located on the Geisinger Commonwealth web page (tcmc.edu). The log is a record of all criminal activity reported to the Public Safety Department. The log, which is open for public inspection, lists the nature, date, time, and general location of the criminal activity reported. The crime statistics are also published for a three-year period and are available at the Public Safety Department.

Emergency Notification System

In the event of an emergency situation requiring immediate campus-wide precautions and actions, the Geisinger Commonwealth Public Safety Department is authorized to activate the emergency alert notification system. Immediately prior to activation, public safety officers will be dispatched to the scene and a 911 call will be made to trigger a response from the appropriate first responder. Geisinger Commonwealth will utilize the Blackboard Connect system for emergency notification. To register, or make changes to your pre-established account go to portal.tcmc.edu and log onto the portal. Click on the Emergency Notification System icon and fill is the requested information.

Access to Campus Facilities

Geisinger Commonwealth has installed card readers on all entrances, classrooms, student community rooms, laboratories, and common areas being utilized by Geisinger Commonwealth Students. Your student identification card has been programmed to grant you the appropriate level of access to the MSB. Geisinger Commonwealth students will gain after-hours entry into the building by entering from Pine St or Gibson St. If your ID card is lost/stolen, you must immediately report it to Department of Public Safety, and have a new card issued. This action will also deactivate the lost/stolen card.

Parking

Geisinger Commonwealth offers parking to all students. However, students who wish to utilize parking provided by the institution will be assessed $100.00 to park for the year. This fee will not be included in your tuition payment. Students can register for parking from the pre-matriculation page, or can log onto the Geisinger Commonwealth portal, click on Facilities & Public Safety, click on Register for Parking Permit and register electronically. Once registration is completed, a parking permit which must be displayed on the vehicle will be available for pick up at the Reception Desk. The year begins on August 1st. Parking must be renewed annually. An escort is available from Public Safety. Contact the security desk to receive a walking/riding escort.

Fire Safety

Fire safety is of primary importance, and Geisinger Commonwealth recommends the following measures to maintain a safe environment.

  • If you observe or suspect a fire, activate the building fire alarm immediately. All fires regardless of size must be reported to the Safety Department.
  • If the fire alarm sounds, don’t panic, keep calm, prior to opening the door feel for excessive heat. .If the door feels hot do not open the door.
  • Listen to the emergency message being broadcast to determine whether an evacuation is needed. There may be alternate instructions other than evacuate.
  • Do not use the elevator.
  • Evacuate the building and go directly to B parking lot. Remain at that location until directed to move by Geisinger Commonwealth officials or the Scranton Fire Department.
  • If you can’t evacuate the area, remain calm.
  • Don’t break the window unless the room is filling with smoke.
  • Stay calm and wait for help.

Evacuation routes are posted in all Geisinger Commonwealth areas.

Building and Grounds

Public Safety Officers conduct lighting surveys on a regular basis, and submit facilities work requests to repair lights that are not operating properly. The Facilities staff tends to college building and grounds with a concern for safety of the community members. They are available to respond to calls for service regarding unsafe conditions. These conditions include, but are not limited to, unsafe steps, rails, and icy/snow covered walks. We encourage any member of the community to immediately report unsafe conditions to the Facility Department.

Crisis Management Plan

Standard procedures for the release of information during and following any critical incident on campus are as follows:

  • The policy of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine will be to release accurate consistent information to members of affected groups and to representatives of recognized news gathering organizations, when such releases will not endanger or impair the welfare of individuals conducting the investigation or inquiry into the incident.
  • When management or investigation of a crisis involves officials or other authority agencies, all information released will be coordinated with appropriate individuals of those organizations.
  • In all situations, the only college spokesperson who provides information to the media will be the Dean or the Director of Marketing and Public Relations, or their designee(s) as determined by a case-by-case basis. Persons not designated should direct all queries to the appropriate spokesperson.

Campus Safety: Doing Your Part

All Crimes should be reported to the Public Safety Department as soon as possible.

In the House or the Apartment

  • Never use your first name in the telephone directories or mailboxes and avoid using prefixes: Mrs., Miss, or Ms. List your first initial only.
  • After moving into a new home or apartment, it is a good idea to change the door locks. Every window that can be entered from the outside should have a good lock and be properly secured.
  • Never open your door to strangers! Repair persons and sales persons carry proper identification. It is in your best interest to request they show it to you before you admit them. Also, most repair persons and sales persons make appointments beforehand. During non-working hours, if repair persons are making “emergency” repairs or checks, confirm the necessity for the work by phone before admittance.
  • If someone wants to use your phone, no matter what the emergency claimed, offer to make the call. Do not open the door.
  • Always keep windows secured and covered at night. Never reveal either in person or to a telephone caller, that you are alone. Have two lights on in different locations of the house. This gives the impression of more than one person at home. To secure sliding doors, place a strong wooden broom handle or dowel in the lower track of the door.
  • In apartment buildings, be wary of deserted laundry rooms.

On Campus

  • When walking at night, use the best-lighted route and try not to walk alone, if possible.
  • Do not jog alone.
  • Do not leave personal property unattended, anywhere or anytime.
  • If you are a victim of a crime, notify the Public Safety Department immediately.
  • Report any encounters with voyeurs or exhibitionists to the Public Safety Department

Walking

  • Walk near the center of the sidewalk and use the busiest, safest and best-lighted routes. Avoid alleys, parks, vacant lots and parking areas that are deserted and dark.
  • Never hitchhike.
  • If you think someone is following you, cross the street, walk faster or even walk down the middle of the street. Try to go to a lighted area, store or near a group of people.
  • Do not accept rides from strangers. If a car approaches and you are threatened, walk in the opposite direction of the vehicle.
  • Do not overload yourself with packages, books and other things.
  • If your purse is snatched or if you are approached by a potential robber … DON’T FIGHT. Cooperate rather than risk injury. It will not be a great loss if you carry no more cash than is absolutely necessary and keep a list at home of all credit cards, licenses, etc.

Driving

  • When you walk to your vehicle, have your keys ready in your hand so you will not have to stand outside your car looking for them.
  • Always check the rear seat and floor before you get into your car.
  • Lock the doors as soon as you get into your vehicle and keep them locked.
  • Do not pick up hitchhikers.
  • When stopping your car in traffic, always leave enough room to pull around any stopped vehicle that may be in front of you.
  • If you believe you are being followed by another car, do not turn into your driveway or parking lot. Attempt to locate open businesses, or drive to the nearest police department. Use your horn and lights to attract attention. Try to obtain a license number of the other vehicle to pass on to police.
  • If you have car trouble, raise the hood and sit inside your car with the doors locked until assistance arrives. Ask the person who approaches to call a service truck for you. Keep an ample supply of gasoline.
  • Do not stop to offer help to a stranded motorist, male or female. Stop at the next public telephone and call the police or a service station.
  • If you park your car and the attendant asks you to leave your keys, leave only the car key.
  • Place valuables in the locked trunk or otherwise conceal where they cannot be seen.
  • Always lock your bicycle with a good lock and secure it to a bicycle lock.

Psychological Prevention

  • BE PREPARED: There is a lot you can do to avoid becoming a victim, or to respond effectively if a crime does take place.
  • Educate yourself concerning crime prevention tactics.
  • Consider in advance, what you would do if confronted by a criminal.

Everyone must work together to create a safe campus. Please report all crimes to the Public Safety Department. Staff is on duty 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Elevator

  • If while waiting for an elevator, you find yourself alone with a stranger, let him/her take the elevator and wait for its return.
  • If you are on with someone who makes you feel uneasy, get off at the next floor.
  • Always stand near the control panel, where you have access to the alarm and floor buttons.
  • Incident Reporting You are encouraged to immediately report any incidents of this nature to the Public Safety Department. Keep in mind that any assailant who is allowed to go free is a potential future danger, not only to you but also to other members of the community.
  • Every situation will be different. Therefore, we cannot provide any specific rules as to what to do or not to do if you are faced with a threat. Only you can make the determination as to the appropriate course of action.
  • If you think you are being followed, you can call out for assistance and run to a lighted building or residence; enlist the assistance of a passerby or flag down a passing vehicle, break a window in a building or residence or pull a fire alarm. Do anything that might attract attention or summon assistance.

What you can do

Your involvement is essential to the prevention of crime on campus. Disinterest and complacency are the prime contributors to the success of crime. The burden of crime prevention rests not only with the Public Safety Department but also with each member of the Geisinger Commonwealth Community.

Public Safety cannot be everywhere at once and are, therefore, dependent upon you to recognize and report incidents of suspicious and criminal activity. The extent of your cooperation will greatly influence Public Safety’s effectiveness in fighting crime.

Doing your part means

  • Being aware of your vulnerability and following the suggestions outlined in this document to protect yourself and your property.
  • Being alert for suspicious or criminal activity and conditions that may represent a hazard to the community.
  • Getting involved by becoming more security conscious and by reporting all incidents of suspicious or criminal activity, no matter how insignificant, to the Public Safety Department immediately.

Remember that unreported crimes cannot be solved in that, by not reporting crimes, you allow the perpetrators to commit additional and perhaps more serious crimes. Many times crime solving depends upon how accurately and properly the incident is reported.

It is important that you be able to provide as much of the following information as possible:

  • The nature of the incident.
  • When and where the incident occurred.
  • Number of persons involved (names, sex, race, age, height).
  • Direction and method of travel.
  • Vehicles involved (color, type, make, model, license plate number and state, distinctive characteristics, i.e., decals, bumper stickers, damage, number of occupants).
  • Description of stolen property (item, manufacturer model number, serial number, value, color, dimensions, etc.).
  • Any other applicable information

Sexual Offender Registration

The Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexual Violent Offender Registration Act sets the requirements for sex offender registration and community notification. The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000 provides for the tracking of convicted sex offenders enrolled at, or employed by, institutions of higher education. Persons seeking to obtain sex offender registration information may do so by contacting the Scranton Police Department at (570) 348-4141, or the Pennsylvania State Police Sexually Violent Predator web site at www.psp2.state.pa.us.

Timely Warnings

To help prevent and mitigate crimes and potential threats, the Public Safety Department, in conjunction with other College Departments, issues timely warnings to notify the College community about crimes/threats in and around the College. Timely warnings are distributed using a variety of methods. Once the decision has been made to issue a warning, the warning is disseminated using e-mail- broadcast messages.

Firearms, Fireworks, and Weapons

The possession, or use of, firearms, ammunition, fireworks, major/minor explosives, or any potentially lethal weapon is prohibited anywhere on campus.

Student Health and Welfare

Student Health Webpage

Geisinger Commonwealth provides confidential, professional, and culturally sensitive preventive and therapeutic health services to medical students. Students also receive health education for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of routine illness and injuries.

Geisinger Commonwealth Student Health Service (SHS) aims to support the educational experience of students and to minimize health-related barriers to learning by providing high-quality health services and health education. Our mission also includes guiding students toward a personal commitment to wellness and self-care that will lay the foundation for a healthy life, assisting them in becoming self-directed and well-informed, active consumers of healthcare as well as “model” patients in the community.

Key Student Health Links:

Location

Temporary Location (July-August 2017)

721 Adams Ave, Scranton, PA 18503
Phone:  570-591-5280
Fax:  570-591-5281

Summer hours:

Monday – Thursday, 7:00 AM to 3:30 PM
Friday appointment accommodations will be made on an individual basis

Permanent Location (September 2017)

1401 Fellows Ave, Scranton, PA 18504
Phone:  570-591-5280
Fax: 570-591-5281

Appointments are encouraged: Call Mary Kay O’Malley at (570) 955-1474 or email omalleyk@thewrightcenter.org. Appointments are scheduled according to individual needs. Walk-in appointments are welcome during hours of operation.

To reach The Wright Center patient portal, visit their website.

Fax: 570-955-1475

Hours of Operation

In addition to the hours listed below, Mary Kay O’Malley, LPN is available Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., to provide the following services: vaccinations, PPDs & PPD readings, drug testing, and mask fitting.

North Campus Student Health Service Hours of Operation are as follows:

Monday

8:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
William Dempsey, M.D.

12:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Allyson Favuzza, CRNP

Tuesday

8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Allyson Favuzza, CRNP

Wednesday

8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Allyson Favuzza, CRNP

Thursday

8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Allyson Favuzza, CRNP

Friday

8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Allyson Favuzza, CRNP

After hours and emergency care:

For after hours and weekend emergencies, please call (570) 955-1474 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Local emergency rooms available in the North Regional Campus include:

Moses Taylor Hospital
700 Quincy Avenue
Scranton PA, 18510
(570) 340-2100

 Regional Hospital of Scranton
746 Jefferson Avenue
Scranton, PA 18501
(570) 348-7100

Geisinger – Community Medical Center
1800 Mulberry Street
Scranton, PA 18510
(570) 969-8000

For after hours, non-medical Student Affairs emergencies, there is a Student Affairs Administrator on call and can be reached at (570) 687-9700.

Regional campus support for student health:

MBS students in Doylestown and students in the West, South and Guthrie campuses can continue to utilize Student Health Services in the North for healthcare. However, for more accessible healthcare services, Geisinger Commonwealth/Student Health Services has made arrangements with physicians and practices located within the region. Students can make appoints by calling the physician offices directly.

 South Campus Primary Care Physicians

Office of Dr. Tina George
822 McAlpine Street
Avoca, PA 18641
(570) 414-1080

South Campus Student Health Service Hours of Operation are as follows:

Monday

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday

8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Local emergency rooms available in the South Regional Campus include:

Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
575 North River Street 
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18764
(570) 829-8111

Geisinger Wyoming Valley
1000 E. Mountain Boulevard
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
(570) 808-7300

Central Campus Primary Care Physicians

Danville Family Practice 
Dr. Timothy Eckel
1410 Bloom Rd
Danville PA 17821
Phone:  570-275-3789
Fax:  570-275-6673
http://www.danvillefamilypractice.com/

Counseling Resources:

Bloomsburg Psychlogical Center
816 Central Road
Bloomsburg, PA 17815
Phone: 570-387-1832
Offers counseling, therapy dogs, community support groups for various topics.

Willow Tree Wellness and Counseling
298 East 5th Street, Suite #2
Bloomsburg, PA 17815
Phone:  570-317-2999
http://www.willowtreewc.com/
Counseling, psychiatry, yoga, nutrition.

Dental care:

John D. Rinehart
Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
570-275-2684
http://www.rinehartdentist.com/

Vision:

The Eye Center of Central PA
1-866-995-EYES (3937)
http://www.eyecenterofpa.com/

Finnegan Eye Care Centers
Bloomsburg, PA
570-279-4003
http://www.drgaryfinnegan.com/

Northeastern Eye Institute 
Bloomsburg, PA
570-389-1445

Guthrie Campus Primary Care Physicians

Athens Guthrie Clinic – All Providers
412 S. Main Street Athens, PA 18810
570-878-9655
Fax 570-888-3842
Students can make an appointment by calling the Athens office. All appointments will be scheduled according to the individual needs of the students.

Guthrie Now – Telehealth App

Guthrie Campus Student Health Service Hours of Operation are as follows:

Monday

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Wednesday

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday

9 a.m – 5 p.m.

Emergency Care in Sayre

Robert Packer Hospital Emergency Department
One Guthrie Square, Sayre, PA 18810
570-887-6390

Acute Care Today Clinic (ACT Clinic)
One Guthrie Square, Sayre, PA 18810
570-887-2383

Doylestown Primary Care Physicians

Dr. Elliot Schnur at Doylestown Family Medicine
300 Spruce St
Doylestown, PA 18901
215-230-7800
Fax: 215-230-7993

Central Bucks Family Practice
252 W Swamp Rd Suite 41
Doylestown, PA 18901                   
P: 215.348.1706
Dennis H. Tafflin, D.O., A.O.B.F.P.
David A. Smith M.D., A.B.F.P.
Sarah E. Robin D.O., A.B.F.P.
Philip R. Treiman M.D., A.B.F.P.
Robert G. Lewcun D.O., A.O.B.F.P.
Jeffrey Laphen M.D., A.B.F.P.
Deborah S. Wright M.D., A.B.F.P.
Linda A Thornton, P.A.-C.

  

Student Health Insurance

All Geisinger Commonwealth students are required to have medical insurance. Students have the option of purchasing a Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) student health plan from Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. This plan is administered by Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield.

Please note the following:

  • All Geisinger Commonwealth students are required to have medical insurance at all times while enrolled.
  • Students must provide Sharon Bednarz with documentation of medical insurance regardless of the carrier.
  • Students have the option of selecting from one of the plans below or can enroll in another plan of their choosing. Please carefully review all the Benefit Summaries and pay close attention to the deductible information for in-network and out of network costs prior to making a decision.
  • Students can enroll in medical only or add vision and or dental. 

The plan year begins August 1 of every year and ends twelve months later or July 31 of the following year. The election is an annual process and does not automatically continue year after year.

Students may choose to waive the option to purchase student coverage from Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Student Plan by completing the Opt-Out Form. In order to waive coverage, students must supply a copy of the health insurance identification card for which they are currently enrolled and return the waiver form to the Student Affairs Office. Students can re-enter Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Student Plan at any time and will be billed accordingly.

The PPO student health plan from Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine through Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield does meet the recommended coverage suggested by the AAMC Group on Student Affairs regarding Healthcare and Insurance. This insurance will include:

  1. Coverage for the full 12-month year
  2. Coverage for pre-existing conditions
  3. Provisions to purchase additional coverage for spouses and dependents at market cost
  4. Access to and coverage for mental health services by mental health professionals in concordance with current LCME standards
  5. Prescription drug coverage
  6. Lifetime coverage limits consistent with the cost of a major or catastrophic medical illness
  7. Coverage during out of state rotations

Health Insurance Rate Information can be found on our website:

https://tcmc.edu/students/student-health-services/student-health-and-disability-insurance/

Disability Insurance Information

Disability insurance  is provided and required for all medical students. INS MED is the insurance carrier and costs the student $50 per year.

Students are provided clear, concise explanations of school health and disability insurance plans, including information related to additional fees for services beyond standard insurance coverage and the additional fees to cover a spouse and/or dependents.

 

Student Identification

Geisinger Commonwealth faculty, staff and students are required to wear identification badges while on College property or as part of College activities. Students are required to wear their ID badge on our Regional Campuses or while participating with any of our academic partners.

All Geisinger Commonwealth students, faculty and employees will be issued picture identification badges upon arrival. The badges will also control admittance to Geisinger Commonwealth education facilities as deemed necessary by position/function. Visitors, students, faculty and employees will be limited to the areas necessary to perform job functions or visit with a desired party. At the conclusion of their business in the College, the visitors badge must be surrendered to the receptionist or public safety officer on duty. Any member of the public who enters the building, may be challenged to produce identification and state their business by authorized members of the College community. Access may be denied by College officials at the discretion of the College.

The complete ID badge policy can be found on the portal in the policies section.

 

Student Space and Room Reservations

The following areas are approved study spaces for all students. We ask your cooperation in leaving the rooms as you find them by discarding your trash and not removing any books or journals, otherwise the privilege of using these facilities will be rescinded. Do not prop open doors or allow individuals to access the rooms using student ID badges. Both of these are considered to be professionalism violations and will be dealt with appropriately. Please note that the registrar reserves the right to cancel reservations if the rooms are needed for educational activities.

Geisinger Commonwealth Library

The library has approximately 100 study seats at tables and individual carrels distributed throughout the library. All of these spaces are available to all Geisinger Commonwealth students 24 hours per day.

Geisinger Commonwealth Team Rooms

The Geisinger Commonwealth Team Rooms may be used if they are unoccupied. Students interested in reserving these rooms should do so via the scheduling resources link on the Geisinger Commonwealth portal. Students have access to these rooms 24 hours per day. The general appearance of the rooms and organization of equipment needs to be restored to good order so as to be ready for class instruction the next day. Please find the room reservation guidelines below. These guidelines are also posted on each team room door.

ROOM RESERVATION GUIDELINES

  • Room reservations should be made only during non-class time.
  • Any one reservation request cannot exceed two weeks.
  • Once a reservation is placed, the room must be occupied no later than 20 minutes after reservation start time or the reservation becomes void.
  • Proper reservations will take precedence over those using the room without a reservation.
  • Team rooms are designed for group study. Please be considerate of classmates, when reserving team rooms.
  • If you no longer need a room you previously reserved, please go into the reservations system and delete it.
  • If you need to store your belongings during lunch or class please do so in one of the fourth floor lockers. Feel free to pick any available locker and put your own lock on it. Be sure to email Steven Jarbola at sjarbola@tcmc.edu with your locker number.

*Please note: if you leave your belongings unattended for more than an hour in the library or team rooms, staff will take them to the front desk so that other students can utilize the study space.

Geisinger Commonwealth Lecture Halls (2001& 2045)

Students interested in reserving these rooms for club/organization purposes should complete the meeting event approval form found on the Medical Student Council Portal page. Students may access these rooms for individual study when unoccupied. The general appearance of the rooms and organization of equipment needs to be restored to good order so as to be ready for class instruction the next day.

Geisinger Commonwealth Classrooms (3073, 3079, 3083, 4011 & 4013)

Students interested in reserving these rooms for club/organization purposes should complete the meeting event approval form found on the Medical Student Council Portal page. Students may access these rooms for individual study when unoccupied. The general appearance of the rooms and organization of equipment needs to be restored to good order so as to be ready for class instruction the next day.

Geisinger Commonwealth Student Lounge

The Geisinger Commonwealth Student lounge located on the fourth floor of the East Wing is available for study 24 hours per day and does not need to be reserved through scheduling resources.

 

Student Transcripts

A transcript is a complete account of each student’s academic history at Geisinger Commonwealth. Courses with the grades are listed for all periods of time when students have been registered.

Official vs. Unofficial Copies

Official transcript copies are printed on security paper, and stamped with the registrar’s seal and date. They are mostly directly sent to third parties but may be given to students in a sealed envelope if appropriate. (Most applications for academic programs, scholarship programs, etc. require an official copy of your transcript).

Unofficial transcript copies are printed on plain paper. They are not stamped with the Registrar’s seal. They are given directly to students for their use.

To request a transcript (MD or Graduate School) please include the following information in a letter:

  1. Name and signature.
  2. Transcript fee (checks payable to Geisinger Commonwealth)
    There is a $5 transcript fee if you are a Geisinger Commonwealth graduate
    There is no fee if you are a current Geisinger Commonwealth student:
  3. Empower ID (found on the first page of your Empower web account)
  4. Number of transcripts requested
  5. Address (s) to mail transcript

Generally, transcripts are sent out within one week of receipt of your request.

Requests should be forwarded to the Geisinger Commonwealth Registrar’s Office

Official vs. Unofficial Copies

Official transcript copies are printed on security paper, and stamped with the registrar’s seal and date. They are mostly directly sent to third parties but may be given to students in a sealed envelope if appropriate. (Most applications for academic programs, scholarship programs, etc. require an official copy of your transcript).

Unofficial transcript copies are printed on plain paper. They are not stamped with the Registrar’s seal. They are given directly to students for their use.

To request a transcript (MD or Graduate School) please include the following information in a letter:

  1. Name and signature.
  2. Transcript fee (checks payable to Geisinger Commonwealth)
    There is a $5 transcript fee if you are a Geisinger Commonwealth graduate
    There is no fee if you are a current Geisinger Commonwealth student:
  3. Empower ID (found on the first page of your Empower web account)
  4. Number of transcripts requested
  5. Address (s) to mail transcript

Generally, transcripts are sent out within one week of receipt of your request.

Requests should be forwarded to the Geisinger Commonwealth Registrar’s Office.

 

 

 

Student Wellness

The health and well-being of our students is of paramount importance to the college. Students are encouraged to engage in healthy behaviors including participation in programs sponsored by Student Health Services. Student Health Services conducts periodic focus groups and assessment surveys to ensure we are meeting the needs of our students and focuses programming on depression, suicide prevention, stress management, nutrition, and exercise. The Center for Learning Excellence hosts programs focused on study skills and time management.

In addition, students who do enroll in Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Health Insurance Plan have access to Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield’s Wellness Program Toolkit, which is a program that helps the insured manage their overall health and wellness. Specifically, it includes preventive health education, early identification of future health problems, wellness and lifestyle management tools, care coordination and health management for chronic conditions.

Finally, all Geisinger Commonwealth students are encouraged to join a local gym. The Office of Student Affairs has coordinated discounted gym memberships for students in each region.

 

Summer Enrichment Program

Diversity Summer Enrichment Program

In collaboration with Geisinger Commonwealth Summer Research program, the chief diversity officer (CDO) sponsors the Geisinger Commonwealth’s Summer Research Enrichment Program. Through this program, Geisinger Commonwealth provides summer internship/mentorship opportunities to pre-matriculate or undergraduate underrepresented in medicine (URM) and/or economically disadvantaged students admitted to Geisinger Commonwealth or in the case of undergraduate college students aspiring to become physicians. Internships are research-based and pair incoming students with senior basic science or clinical faculty and upper class medical students. The program’s goal is to enhance students’ educational, research and personal performance as well as their overall Geisinger Commonwealth experience.

Diversity Summer Enrichment Program opportunities are offered to qualifying students admitted to Geisinger Commonwealth. Students need to apply for this paid internship as the opportunities are limited. To learn more about the Diversity Summer Enrichment Program, please contact Ida L. Castro, VP Community Engagement and Chief Diversity Officer.

 

Technical Standards (Medical Students)

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine is committed to full compliance with section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (PL 93-112) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA PL 101-336) enacted by Congress in 1990.

Qualified and accepted applicants to Geisinger Commonwealth must be able to complete all requirements inherent in and leading to the MD degree. To ensure this, the college has adopted technical standards for the assessment of all accepted applicants to the college. Because the MD degree signifies that the holder is a physician prepared for entry into the practice of medicine, it follows that graduates must have the knowledge and skills to function in a broad variety of clinical situations and to render a wide spectrum of patient care.

Candidates for the MD degree must have somatic sensation and the functional use of the senses of vision and hearing. Candidates’ diagnostic skills will also be lessened without the functional use of the senses of equilibrium, smell and taste. Additionally, they must have sufficient exteroceptive sense (touch, pain and temperature), sufficient proprioceptive sense (position, pressure, movement, stereognosis and vibratory) and sufficient motor function to permit them to carry out the activities described in the sections that follow. They must be able to consistently, quickly and accurately integrate all information received by whatever sense(s) employed and they must have the intellectual ability to learn, integrate, analyze and synthesize data.

A candidate for the MD degree must have abilities and skills of five varieties including observation; communication; motor; conceptual, integrative and quantitative and behavioral and social. Technological compensation can be made for some handicaps in certain of these areas, but a candidate should be able to perform in a reasonably independent manner.

Observation: The candidate must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences, including but not limited to physiologic and pharmacologic demonstrations, microbiologic cultures and microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states. A candidate must also be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision and somatic sensation. It is enhanced by the functional use of the sense of smell.

Communication: A candidate should be able to speak, to hear and to observe patients in order to elicit information, describe changes in mood, activity and posture and perceive nonverbal communications. A candidate must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech but reading and writing. The candidate must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all members of the healthcare team.

Motor: Candidates should have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and other diagnostic maneuvers. A candidate should be able to do basic laboratory tests (urinalysis, CBC, etc.), carry out diagnostic procedures (proctoscopy, paracentesis, etc.) and read EKG’s and x-rays. A candidate should be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide general care and emergency treatment to patients. Examples of emergency treatment reasonably required of physicians are cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the administration of intravenous medication, the application of pressure to stop bleeding, the opening of obstructed airways, the suturing of simple wounds and the performance of simple obstetrical maneuvers. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities: These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis and synthesis. Problem solving, the creative skills demanded of physicians, requires all these intellectual abilities. In addition, the candidate should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structures.

Behavioral and Social Attributes: A candidate must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his/her intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, the development of mature, sensitive and effective relationships with patients. Candidates must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively under stress. They must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that should be assessed during the admissions and education processes. A candidate must readily be willing and able to examine any patient regardless of the patient’s age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, veteran status or political beliefs.

For more information, please contact the Office of Admissions or Jackie Ghormoz in the Office of Student Affairs.

 

Technology

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine’s Information Technologies and Services Department (ITS) provides overall design, development and management of the college’s information technology environment in support of it’s mission and curriculum. The department supports all regional campuses and the school’s network is available across all locations, creating an environment in which systems, individuals and communities interact seamlessly for learning, teaching, research, community outreach and administration. Through technologies and services, the college strives to create an environment that leads to new possibilities – new bodies of knowledge, new synergies, new capabilities within the school that in turn enable an environment desired and required by students, faculty, staff, affiliates and community stakeholders of the institution.

“My Geisinger Commonwealth” allows students, faculty, and staff to have a virtual view of the institution and the resources available to them. This portal facilitates activities such as groups and organizations, wikis, and blogs. It serves as a vehicle for communicating with students, announcements, task management, calendar events, etc. are all presented via the portal.

The portal also provides students, staff and faculty with in-depth information about Admissions, Regional Campuses, Graduate Medical Education, Research, Patient Care, Human Resources, Faculty Affairs, and Information Technology. The Student Services component of the portal includes Financial Aid, the Center for Learning Excellence, Student Affairs and the Clinical Skills and Simulation Center.

Faculty members use Canvas as the Learning Management System to post course assignments, documents, announcements, grades, etc. for each of their classes. Canvas contains the audio/video delivery system and allows students to view or download course content at any time to a variety of form factors and devices including both browser enabled computers and the latest mobile devices. Classroom capture software is available to faculty members enabling them to provide students with an audio and video record of lectures and laboratory sessions through the portal.

Geisinger Commonwealth’s Technology Development Center, located adjacent to the auditorium, serves as a resource for faculty and students providing audio, photo and video editing software as well as desktop publishing software and a scanner for creation of course content and education related projects.

The college will issue each student a laptop equipped with productivity software and wi-fi connectivity. Many services and support systems have been tailored for the selected computer and customized for the academic environment at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. For example, the laptop will contain the school’s class room recording play back software and other software and tools needed by various components of the curriculum. The laptops are distributed at orientation along with instruction on their use and support. Laptops must be returned upon completion of the degree, or during a leave of absence. 

 

The Regional Education Academy for Careers in Health-Higher Education Initiative (REACH-HEI)

Geisinger Commonwealth created REACH-HEI to provide a seamless pathway from high school through colleges and post-graduate studies to economically disadvantaged students in northeast Pennsylvania (NEPA) who are interested in health-related professions.

The program launch in 2010 was successful thanks to HCOP/HRSA, Department of Health and Human Services funding. Since then, Geisinger Commonwealth, with local and student support has maintained this commitment to our regional youth. REACH-HEI is an out of school time program designed to strengthen students’ proficiencies in science, guide them through career planning and financing of their education and sustain their commitment to health-related professions. The ultimate goal is to reduce the growing gap of physicians and healthcare professionals’ availability and improve overall delivery of healthcare in the region by nurturing regional youth’s interest in life sciences, helping their emotional and academic development and connecting their career goals to community needs.

In 2017, Geisinger Commonwealth received a grant from US Department of Health and Human Services/HRSA to establish a Center for Excellence in Diversity (COE). Our Center of Excellence will further our goal to create a seamless pipeline to medical school for students underrepresented in medicine (URM). This program amplifies our REACH-HEI initiative by supporting undergraduate initiatives.

Currently, Geisinger Commonwealth has programs that serve intermediate and high school students in the greater Scranton area as well as Hazleton communities.

REACH-HEI Partners

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, in partnership with the following educational and community partners, offers an exciting series of pipeline programs for area high school students interested in careers in healthcare.

  • Hazleton Area School District
  • Scranton Area School District
  • Wallenpaupack Area School District
  • Pennsylvania Junior Academy of Science
  • Geisinger Commonwealth SNMA and LMSA Chapters
  • Employment Opportunities Center
  • United Neighborhood Centers
  • Northeast PA Big Brothers Big Sisters
  • Geisinger Community Medical Center

 

Welcome from Academic Affairs

About Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine

Welcome from the President and Dean

Dear Geisinger Commonwealth Student,

One of the most gratifying things I get to do as president and dean is to welcome the new students. You have chosen a challenging and rewarding career path. And you have chosen to begin this path at our remarkable college with its strong and vibrant mission.

Whether you are beginning your first year of medical school or pursuing graduate education coursework toward medical school candidacy or other healthcare professions, you can rest assured knowing there is a community invested in your success. Not only are our dedicated faculty members and staff committed to your success, we are also fortunate to have the support of forward-thinking community leaders, regional physicians and hospital affiliate partners who are engaged in the success of the medical school and the students.

And you are joining this college at an exciting moment in its history.  Just a few months ago we integrated with the Geisinger Health System and became Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.  This exciting linkage of two institutions, both known for innovation and for a commitment to the patient and to the community, expands the opportunities for our students and for development of new programs.  During your time here you will witness our growth as an institution, made possible by our integration.

Our engagement with the community is very real. Right from the start, you will be assigned to work on a Community Health Research Project. I encourage you to get involved in your regional communities and find opportunities to serve and give back. Geisinger Commonwealth was founded on a legacy of service to the community and commitment to exceptional educational experiences based on respect, teamwork, and collaboration.

Our educational philosophy expects the student to be actively engaged. Lifelong learning is a cornerstone to our values and we encourage our faculty and students to seek opportunities for continuous improvement. We look forward to your feedback and new ideas on advancing the educational process and your learning.

Take advantage of the Geisinger Commonwealth orientation experience; it is an opportunity to bond as a class and develop lasting team-building skills and friendships.

On behalf of everyone at Geisinger Commonwealth, we look forward to working with each of you. Please know that my door is always open to you.

Sincerely,

Steven J. Scheinman, MD

 

Welcome from Student Affairs

Dear Geisinger Commonwealth Students,

On behalf of the entire Student Affairs team, it is with warmest regards that I welcome you to Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. Together we will grow, learn, and enjoy each other’s company as we create a future for you, us and the Institution. The Office of Student Affairs is committed to providing you with an exceptional educational experience. As partners with the faculty, we are here to provide you with valuable experiences outside the classroom. By providing meaningful service opportunities, exciting leisure activities, career exploration, academic and personal support, we will assist you in developing the intellectual and professional skills that will enable you to be leaders in your profession and community. As you begin your graduate education, we offer you this Student Bulletin and encourage you to become familiar with the information it contains. The bulletin contains essential information about the services available to you, as well as the rights and responsibilities of the members of our community. As we strive to reflect a community that is respectful and inclusive, and one that is engaged in a “community based, patient-centered, interprofessional and evidence-based model of education”, we value your active participation and collaboration. Your success is important to us, as is the general welfare of our community. The College has developed a set of policies that are included in this Student Bulletin that have been developed to create a safe, engaging, and stimulating learning environment. As we embark on this journey together, we hope you will visit us often and share your ideas and concerns. We are in the process of creating a culture that will continue to welcome and support future generations of students. We look forward to you joining our community and being part of this wonderful Geisinger Commonwealth experience!

Dr. Tanja Adonizio
Associate Dean of Student Affairs